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Arafat's body to be exhumed on Tuesday in murder inquiry
11-25-2012, 05:45 PM #1
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/11/2...6820121124

It is 21 half lives later - (only 1/2,000,000th of any polonium will still be around) but they are finally trying to figure out what killed Arafat.
11-25-2012, 05:53 PM #2
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,578 Threads:1,444 Joined:Feb 2011
hmm.gif I wonder who would have had the motivation to do such? chuckle.gif

wonder.gif
11-25-2012, 05:57 PM #3
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,367 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
They waited long enough to allow testing for polonium. 15.gif
11-26-2012, 01:47 AM #4
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
(11-25-2012, 05:57 PM)Octo Wrote:  They waited long enough to allow testing for polonium. 15.gif


Very puzzling. Why wait until it is too late for most practical purposes to do an exhumation???

Looked around and found this on Al Jazeera:
http://blogs.aljazeera.com/blog/middle-e...afats-tomb
"Until Al Jazeera's July 3, 2012, broadcast of "What Killed Arafat?", historians had chalked the late Palestinian leader's death up to poor health, unknown disease, or even HIV - despite the fact several tests were performed all yielding negative results."

"It is also a fact that significant levels of reactor-made PO210 were recently discovered in Arafat's biological stains and last personal effects, all kept inside a simple green gym bag left undisturbed for the past eight years."

Looks like Al Jazeera was stirring the pot and found something at the bottom.
11-26-2012, 01:52 AM #5
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,367 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
Quote:reactor-made PO210

These substances usually have a signature as to exactly what reactor made them. Would that be the case with polonium too? Do you know?
11-26-2012, 01:59 AM #6
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,367 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
Never mind...

Sources and production of polonium

A freelance killer would not be able to obtain polonium legally from commercially available products in the amounts used for Litvinenko poisoning, because more than microscopic amounts of polonium can only be produced in state-controlled nuclear reactors.[39][69] (see also commercial products containing polonium for detail).

Ninety seven percent of the world's legal polonium-210 (210Po) production occurs in Russia in RBMK reactors[39][70] About 85 grams (450,000 Ci) are produced by Russia annually. According to Sergei Kiriyenko, the head of Russia's state atomic energy agency, RosAtom, all of it goes to U.S. companies through a single authorized supplier. The production of polonium starts from bombardment of bismuth (209Bi) with neutrons at the Ozersk nuclear reactor, near the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia. The product is then transferred to the Avangard Electromechanical Plant in the closed city of Sarov.[39][71][72][73] This of course does not exclude the possibility that the polonium that killed Litvinenko was imported by a licensed commercial distributor, but no one—including the Russian government—has proposed that this is likely, particularly in regard to the radiation detected on the British Airways passenger jets travelling between Moscow and London.[citation needed] Russian investigators have said they could not identify the source of polonium.[74]

Polonium-210 has a half-life of 138 days and decays to the stable daughter isotope of lead, 206Pb. Therefore the source is reduced to about one sixteenth of its original radioactivity about 18 months after production. By measuring the proportion of polonium and lead in a sample, one can establish the production date of polonium. The analysis of impurities in the polonium (a kind of "finger print") allows to identify the place of production.[75] It is assumed by Litvinenko's wife and his close confidant that British investigators were able to identify the place and time of production of polonium used to poison Litvinenko, but their findings remain unpublished.[39]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoning_o...Litvinenko
11-26-2012, 02:54 AM #7
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
(11-26-2012, 01:59 AM)Octo Wrote:  Never mind...

Sources and production of polonium

A freelance killer would not be able to obtain polonium legally from commercially available products in the amounts used for Litvinenko poisoning, because more than microscopic amounts of polonium can only be produced in state-controlled nuclear reactors.[39][69] (see also commercial products containing polonium for detail).

Ninety seven percent of the world's legal polonium-210 (210Po) production occurs in Russia in RBMK reactors[39][70] About 85 grams (450,000 Ci) are produced by Russia annually. According to Sergei Kiriyenko, the head of Russia's state atomic energy agency, RosAtom, all of it goes to U.S. companies through a single authorized supplier. The production of polonium starts from bombardment of bismuth (209Bi) with neutrons at the Ozersk nuclear reactor, near the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia. The product is then transferred to the Avangard Electromechanical Plant in the closed city of Sarov.[39][71][72][73] This of course does not exclude the possibility that the polonium that killed Litvinenko was imported by a licensed commercial distributor, but no one—including the Russian government—has proposed that this is likely, particularly in regard to the radiation detected on the British Airways passenger jets travelling between Moscow and London.[citation needed] Russian investigators have said they could not identify the source of polonium.[74]

Polonium-210 has a half-life of 138 days and decays to the stable daughter isotope of lead, 206Pb. Therefore the source is reduced to about one sixteenth of its original radioactivity about 18 months after production. By measuring the proportion of polonium and lead in a sample, one can establish the production date of polonium. The analysis of impurities in the polonium (a kind of "finger print") allows to identify the place of production.[75] It is assumed by Litvinenko's wife and his close confidant that British investigators were able to identify the place and time of production of polonium used to poison Litvinenko, but their findings remain unpublished.[39]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poisoning_o...Litvinenko


Pick your poison. CIA or KGB (or the current equivalent) was probably involved. The isotopes are mostly made in Russia and mostly used in America. The KGB is the most likely culprit since this is a Russian tactic and Russian isotopes.

Now who would the Russians be backing?
11-26-2012, 04:34 AM #8
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,367 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
This is a very interesting story. I'm sure you're familiar with Mikhail Khodorkovsky:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mikhail_Khodorkovsky

Quote:Initially news of Khodorkovsky's arrest had a significant effect on the share price of Yukos. The Moscow stock market was closed for the first time ever for an hour in order to assure stable trading as prices collapsed. Russia's currency, the ruble, was also hit as some foreign investors questioned the stability of the Russian market. Media reaction in Moscow was almost universally negative in blanket coverage, some of the more enthusiastic pro-business press discussed the end of capitalism, while even the government-owned press criticised the "absurd" method of Khodorkovsky's arrest.

Yukos moved quickly to replace Khodorkovsky with Russian born U.S. citizen Simon Kukes. Simon Kukes, who became the CEO of Yukos, was already an experienced oil executive.

The U.S. State Department said the arrest "raised a number of concerns over the arbitrary use of the judicial system" and was likely to be very damaging to foreign investment in Russia, as it appeared there were "selective" prosecutions occurring against Yukos officials but not against others.

A week after the arrest, the Prosecutor-General froze Khodorkovsky's shares in Yukos to prevent Khodorkovsky from selling his shares although he retains all the shares' voting rights and receives dividends.

Khodorkovsky's arrest alarmed foreign investors and policymakers alike.

In 2003 Khodorkovsky's shares in Yukos passed to Jacob Rothschild under a deal they concluded prior to Khodorkovsky's arrest
11-28-2012, 01:30 AM #9
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,367 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
Found and interesting article on this topic... reading.gif

Yasser Arafat and the Mysteries of Polonium-210

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/1...onium-210/



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