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At least we know it won't be GMO
08-20-2015, 08:07 AM #1
Screaming Yellow Zonkers Member
Posts:2,706 Threads:265 Joined:Apr 2013
Has this been posted before? I remember seeing it before somehow . It's interesting. I was to try it.


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I have had the pleasure of having some mighty oak trees in my life. The beautiful trees have provided shade to sit under, branches for my children to swing from, plenty of leaves to rake in the fall and quiet beauty and strength. They also have provided untold amounts of acorns!

As another fall arrives, I soon will hear the sound of acorns hitting my deck and of squirrels scampering around gathering the bounty under my trees. However, as I search to make better use of my resources, I began wondering if I am neglecting a treasure right there in my yard. Is there anything I can do with all those acorns?

After doing a little research, I discovered that Native American tribes used acorns as one of their primary staple foods. In much the same way they used corn, they used ground acorn nutmeat to make a meal, or flour, for baked goods. They even used them to make acorn coffee.

Acorns are rich in Vitamins B12, B6, folate riboflavin, thiamin and niacin. They also contain iron, calcium, magnesium, sodium, phosphorus, copper manganese and zinc, and are good sources of protein and fiber. Naturalist John Muir called the acorn cakes he made the most “strength giving” food he had ever eaten. But before you start munching on your own baskets of acorns, there is some information you need to know.

Read the rest here, with recipes :
http://www.offthegridnews.com/off-grid-f...th-acorns/

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08-20-2015, 08:10 AM #2
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,011 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
The acorns around here wouldn't make much flour I'm afraid. Not many oaks this far north.
08-20-2015, 08:32 AM #3
Screaming Yellow Zonkers Member
Posts:2,706 Threads:265 Joined:Apr 2013
Pity. Seems like a good thing

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08-20-2015, 04:44 PM #4
bohica Member
Posts:1,601 Threads:196 Joined:Feb 2011
When turkeys are dressed, the belly is always full of acorns, same with deer. (That's if they eat good.)

There's plenty of room for all God's creatures. Right next to the mashed potatoes!
08-20-2015, 05:38 PM #5
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,061 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
I find this very interesting, because, hopefully, in the near future, we may try off-the-grid living and I would very much like to cultivate a forest food garden.

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Not only does one have to prepare the acorns before using as a flour or coffee substitute, but one also has to know which ones to collect (for supplemental chicken feed) and leave for the wildlife is another consideration.

Quote:First off, I've become rather selective about which acorns I pick up and bring home. I gleaned a little factoid from the coverage of the recent recall of factory farmed eggs. Namely that salmonella is carried by rodents, which can introduce the disease to previously healthy poultry flocks. Squirrels are rodents, are abundant in my region, and show a famous interest in acorns. Many of the nuts I find bear evidence of nibbling by squirrels. I do not gather these acorns. Some acorns have broken shells that may or may not be due to squirrel nibbling. They may have taken the damage when they fell on a hard surface. I err on the safe side and don't risk collecting such acorns.

Another type of damage common to acorns is a shell that has split along its grain. This is clearly not caused by rodents, but it still presents a problem. Acorn nutmeats are very high in fat, and they will turn rancid fairly quickly once exposed to air. So acorns with split shells are not candidates for storage. I do bring home a number of acorns with reasonably small splits in the shell and feed them to the hens very quickly. It's a way of using up what I can, even if they can't be kept for storage.

The last type of damage that causes me to reject an acorn at collection is a small hole that indicates a weevil has penetrated the shell and is currently feasting on the nutmeat. If you see two holes (rare when the nuts have just fallen) the weevil has been and gone. Now these nuts too could be collected for the hens if I were willing to segregate the ones with such holes. Laying hens, after all, will just as happily eat weevils as they will acorns. But if the infested acorns are stored with the pristine ones, the weevils will eat their way from one acorn to the next, and there is a net caloric loss with each step up the food chain. So it's either segregate, or don't collect. Mostly I opt not to collect those acorns.

http://livingthefrugallife.blogspot.ca/2...sited.html

I actually found a perfect off-the-grid situation with river access, but hubby does not want to make the leap, yet. gaah.gif
08-20-2015, 05:44 PM #6
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
We lived off grid for the entire summer a few years ago. Best time ever! Especially getting away from TV and newspapers.
It was happiness.
Upon returning to the shït life most are enslaved to, we at least never watched TV again, less the on demand stuff, like paranormal shows and movies, and who needs papers when the internet has that covered.

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08-20-2015, 05:46 PM #7
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,011 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
(08-20-2015, 04:44 PM)bohica Wrote:  When turkeys are dressed, the belly is always full of acorns, same with deer. (That's if they eat good.)

Funny thing is we noticed not even the squirrels around here ate the few acorns we spotted. It's just not part of their natural diet I guess. dunno.gif
08-20-2015, 05:54 PM #8
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,061 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
(08-20-2015, 05:44 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  We lived off grid for the entire summer a few years ago. Best time ever! Especially getting away from TV and newspapers.
It was happiness.
Upon returning to the shït life most are enslaved to, we at least never watched TV again, less the on demand stuff, like paranormal shows and movies, and who needs papers when the internet has that covered.

I am at the point of seeking peace and quite in nature, but I'm not so sure hubby is ready for it. I hope he'll at least give it a try, we can always sell and revert back.
08-20-2015, 05:58 PM #9
bohica Member
Posts:1,601 Threads:196 Joined:Feb 2011
Funny thing is we noticed not even the squirrels around here ate the few acorns we spotted. It's just not part of their natural diet I guess. dunno.gif
[/quote]

You tell them finicky squirrels that they'll eat acorns, and they'll like it. Or kill them.

There's plenty of room for all God's creatures. Right next to the mashed potatoes!
08-20-2015, 06:08 PM #10
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,061 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
Maybe those squirrels eat only one species of acorn. dunno.gif

http://www.wikihow.com/Identify-Oaks-by-the-Acorns

http://www.motherearthnews.com/real-food...ozraw.aspx

"Gambel Oak (Q. gambehi): This small to medium-size tree is the most common oak of the Rockies. The sweet 1 " acorns, which mature in one season, were used extensively by the Indians."

http://www.unps.org/index.html?hybridoak/hybridoak.html

"Amazingly, the annual nut crop from oak trees in North America surpasses the combined yearly yield of all other nut trees, both wild and cultivated. (So if you're wondering whether gathering up a bushel or two of acorns will deprive some creature of sustenance, worry not.) There are more than 60 species of oak trees in North America, and every one of them produces edible acorns."

http://www.motherearthnews.com/nature-an...ozgoe.aspx

So when looking for sweet acorns, the tree's leaves should be rounded not pointed.

"Some, however, are more edible than others. Oaks are broadly divided into two groups: red (or black) oaks, and white. Generally, nuts from trees in the red-oak group have a bitter taste, thanks to their high content of tannin, an astringent substance. White oaks, however, contain less tannin and produce acorns that are considerably sweeter.

To distinguish between the two groups, look at the leaves of the tree in question. If the leaf lobes (the projections around the outer edge) are distinctly pointed, the tree is most likely a bitter-acorn, red-oak variety: pin, black, red, scarlet and willow oaks are members of the family. White-oak leaves, on the other hand, have rounded lobes. Chestnut, bur, live, white, gambel (also known as Rocky Mountain white) and post oaks are examples of sweet-acorn types. Another distinguishing feature is the inner surface of an acorn's cap: If it's smooth, the nut probably is from a white oak; if it's fuzzy, chances are the nut was produced by a red."
08-20-2015, 06:16 PM #11
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
İmage

They are quite different from Squirrels in North America. They strip conifer cones to get at the seeds within, and don't even recognize acorns as food.
They are also omnivores, so lutefisk is not out of the question.

wonder.gif
08-20-2015, 06:24 PM #12
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,061 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
As Octo mentions above, perhaps Finland's forest don't contain many oak trees, and maybe the ones that do grow are not the rounded-leaf, sweet acorn variety. Also, due to the scarcity of acorns there, perhaps the squirrels evolved to forage for food sources that are more readily abundant.

http://www.borealforest.org/world/world_finland.htm
08-20-2015, 11:39 PM #13
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,011 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
(08-20-2015, 05:58 PM)bohica Wrote:  
Octo Wrote:Funny thing is we noticed not even the squirrels around here ate the few acorns we spotted. It's just not part of their natural diet I guess. dunno.gif

You tell them finicky squirrels that they'll eat acorns, and they'll like it. Or kill them.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/oravannahka

Oravannahka

Genitive of oravan ‎(“squirrel's”) + nahka ‎(“skin”)

Squirrel was earlier an important fur animal in Finland, and its furs served also as means of exchange. The original meaning of the Finnish word raha ("money") is "squirrel skin".

yup.gif
08-20-2015, 11:41 PM #14
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
Ocker may know about that... squirrelmoney.co.nz

wonder.gif
08-20-2015, 11:53 PM #15
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,011 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
Quercus robur, commonly known as the English oak or pedunculate oak or French oak, is what would grow here if it did. The oaks up here are planted specimens.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quercus_robur

İmage



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