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DNA Builds
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-15-2012, 03:28 AM #1
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
brain waves
Epsilon Wave - (under 0 Hz) - Most Blissful Brain wave
Delta wave – (0.1–4 Hz)
Theta wave – (4–7 Hz)
Mu wave – (8–13 Hz)
Beta wave – (12–30 Hz)
Gamma wave – (25–100 Hz)
Lambda wave - (above 100 hz) - Most Pissed Brain wave

hz is cycles per second

-360
Pink wave at 5 cycles per second is different the Pink wave at 20 cycles per
and +360
Pink wave at 5 cycles per second is different the Pink wave at 20 cycles per
even though pink is in both
one is positive pink
one is negative pink
would put you in total different zones

for example
you could have

a 100% positive like sex and 100% positive not like sex
a neutral that liked sex and neutral that didnt like sex
a 100 negative that liked sex and 100 negative that dont like sex

then SIN wave
&
Non Sin Wave
07-15-2012, 09:47 PM #2
Accidental Stoner Member
Posts:8,924 Threads:71 Joined:Feb 2011
Don't like sex???

wtf2.gif
07-16-2012, 12:26 AM #3
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
hmm.gif Interesting thing that DNA, has a "lensing" effect in it. Micro worm holes. Where do you think the other side of that wormhole may be?

wonder.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 09:57 AM #4
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-15-2012, 09:47 PM)Accidental Stoner Wrote:  Don't like sex???

wtf2.gif

blue wave sound
dont have sex
not sure why
I was listening to blue wave sound,, and my wife stripped my clothers off and had sex... she said that type dont have sex
07-17-2012, 09:58 AM #5
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
chuckle.gif Sounds like everything went well then eh? :fuckineh:

wonder.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 09:59 AM #6
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-17-2012, 09:57 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(07-15-2012, 09:47 PM)Accidental Stoner Wrote:  Don't like sex???

wtf2.gif

blue wave sound
dont have sex
not sure why
I was listening to blue wave sound,, and my wife stripped my clothers off and had sex... she said that type dont have sex
Blue noise
Blue spectrum (+3 dB/octave)

Blue noise is also called azure noise. Blue noise's power density increases 3 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to f ) over a finite frequency range.[1][4] In computer graphics, the term "blue noise" is sometimes used more loosely as any noise with minimal low frequency components and no concentrated spikes in energy. This can be good noise for dithering.[5] Retinal cells are arranged in a blue-noise-like pattern which yields good visual resolution.[6][5]

blue noise not sexy type
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 09:59 AM #7
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-17-2012, 09:57 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(07-15-2012, 09:47 PM)Accidental Stoner Wrote:  Don't like sex???

wtf2.gif

blue wave sound
dont have sex
not sure why
I was listening to blue wave sound,, and my wife stripped my clothers off and had sex... she said that type dont have sex
that was a year ago, divorced now,, havent had sex... in a year
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 10:01 AM #8
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
Pink noise
Pink noise spectrum. Power density falls off at 10 dB/decade (−3 dB/octave).

The frequency spectrum of pink noise is linear in logarithmic space; it has equal power in bands that are proportionally wide.[1][2] This means that pink noise would have equal power in the frequency range from 40 to 60 Hz as in the band from 4000 to 6000 Hz. Since humans hear in such a proportional space, where a doubling of frequency (an octave) is perceived the same regardless of actual frequency (40–60 Hz is heard as the same interval and distance as 4000–6000 Hz), every octave contains the same amount of energy and thus pink noise is often used as a reference signal in audio engineering. The power density, compared with white noise, decreases by 3 dB per octave (density proportional to 1/f ). For this reason, pink noise is often called "1/f noise".

Since there are an infinite number of logarithmic bands at both the low frequency (DC) and high frequency ends of the spectrum, any finite energy spectrum must have less energy than pink noise at both ends. Pink noise is the only power-law spectral density that has this property: all steeper power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the high-frequency end, and all flatter power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the DC, low-frequency limit.

10 seconds of pink noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Brown(ian) noise
Brown spectrum (−6 dB/octave)

In fields that adopt precise definitions, the terminology "red noise", also called Brown noise or Brownian noise, will usually refer to a power density which decreases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to 1/f 2)[1] over a frequency range which does not include DC (in a general sense, does not include a constant component, or value at zero frequency). In areas where terminology is used loosely, "red noise" may refer to any system where power density decreases with increasing frequency.[3]

The first definition can be generated by an algorithm which simulates Brownian motion or by integrating white noise. "Brown" noise is not named for a power spectrum that suggests the colour brown; rather, the name is a corruption of Brownian motion. "Red noise" describes the shape of the power spectrum, with pink being between red and white. Also known as "random walk" or "drunkard's walk" noise.

10 seconds of Brown noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Blue noise
Blue spectrum (+3 dB/octave)

Blue noise is also called azure noise. Blue noise's power density increases 3 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to f ) over a finite frequency range.[1][4] In computer graphics, the term "blue noise" is sometimes used more loosely as any noise with minimal low frequency components and no concentrated spikes in energy. This can be good noise for dithering.[5] Retinal cells are arranged in a blue-noise-like pattern which yields good visual resolution.[6][5]

10 seconds of blue noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Violet noise
Violet spectrum (+6 dB/octave)

Violet noise is also called purple noise. Violet noise's power density increases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency[1][7][8] (density proportional to f 2) over a finite frequency range. It is also known as differentiated white noise, due to its being the result of the differentiation of a white noise signal.

10 seconds of violet noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Grey noise
Grey spectrum

Grey noise is random white noise subjected to a psychoacoustic equal loudness curve (such as an inverted A-weighting curve) over a given range of frequencies, giving the listener the perception that it is equally loud at all frequencies.[citation needed] This is in contrast to standard white noise which has equal strength over a linear scale of frequencies but is not perceived as being equally loud due to biases in the human equal-loudness contour.

10 seconds of grey noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Unofficial colors

There are also many "unofficial" colors, usually with multiple definitions.
Red noise

A synonym for Brownian noise, as above[9]
A synonym for pink noise, as above[10]

Orange noise

Orange noise is quasi-stationary noise with a finite power spectrum with a finite number of small bands of zero energy dispersed throughout a continuous spectrum. These bands of zero energy are centered about the frequencies of musical notes in whatever scale is of interest. Since all in-tune musical notes are eliminated, the remaining spectrum could be said to consist of sour, citrus, or "orange" notes.[11]
Green noise

"Green noise is supposedly the background noise of the world. A really long term power spectrum averaged over several outdoor sites. Rather like pink noise with a hump added around 500 Hz."[11]
The mid-frequency component of white noise, used in halftone dithering[12]
Bounded Brownian noise

Black noise

Black noise is also called silent noise.

Silence[1]
Noise with a 1/fβ spectrum, where β > 2 (Manfred Schroeder, "Fractals, chaos, power laws"). Used in modeling various environmental processes.[11]
Noise that has a frequency spectrum of predominantly zero power level over all frequencies except for a few narrow bands or spikes. Note: An example of black noise in a facsimile transmission system is the spectrum that might be obtained when scanning a black area in which there are a few random white spots. Thus, in the time domain, a few random pulses occur while scanning.[13]
"The output of an active noise control system which cancels an existing noise, leaving the local environment noise free. The comic book character Iron Man used to have a "black light beam" that could darken a room in this manner, and popular science fiction has a tendency to portray active noise control in this light."[11] The Batman Beyond supervillian Shriek also had a weapon like this, which effectively blocked out all noise.[citation needed]
"As seen in the sales literature for an ultrasonic vermin repeller, black noise with a power density that is constant for a finite frequency range above 20 kHz. More accurately, ultrasonic white noise. This black noise is like the so-called black light with frequencies too high to be sensed, but still capable of affecting the environment."[11]
Noise with a spectrum corresponding to the blackbody radiation (thermal noise).

Noisy white

In telecommunication, the term noisy white has the following meanings:[14]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the white area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a white area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable black spots on the display surface or record medium.

Noisy black

In telecommunication, the term noisy black has the following meanings:[15]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the black area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a black area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable white spots on the display surface or record medium.
07-17-2012, 10:01 AM #9
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
bored.gif Sorry to hear that.

wonder.gif
07-17-2012, 10:03 AM #10
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
(07-17-2012, 10:01 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  Pink noise
Pink noise spectrum. Power density falls off at 10 dB/decade (−3 dB/octave).

The frequency spectrum of pink noise is linear in logarithmic space; it has equal power in bands that are proportionally wide.[1][2] This means that pink noise would have equal power in the frequency range from 40 to 60 Hz as in the band from 4000 to 6000 Hz. Since humans hear in such a proportional space, where a doubling of frequency (an octave) is perceived the same regardless of actual frequency (40–60 Hz is heard as the same interval and distance as 4000–6000 Hz), every octave contains the same amount of energy and thus pink noise is often used as a reference signal in audio engineering. The power density, compared with white noise, decreases by 3 dB per octave (density proportional to 1/f ). For this reason, pink noise is often called "1/f noise".

Since there are an infinite number of logarithmic bands at both the low frequency (DC) and high frequency ends of the spectrum, any finite energy spectrum must have less energy than pink noise at both ends. Pink noise is the only power-law spectral density that has this property: all steeper power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the high-frequency end, and all flatter power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the DC, low-frequency limit.

10 seconds of pink noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Brown(ian) noise
Brown spectrum (−6 dB/octave)

In fields that adopt precise definitions, the terminology "red noise", also called Brown noise or Brownian noise, will usually refer to a power density which decreases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to 1/f 2)[1] over a frequency range which does not include DC (in a general sense, does not include a constant component, or value at zero frequency). In areas where terminology is used loosely, "red noise" may refer to any system where power density decreases with increasing frequency.[3]

The first definition can be generated by an algorithm which simulates Brownian motion or by integrating white noise. "Brown" noise is not named for a power spectrum that suggests the colour brown; rather, the name is a corruption of Brownian motion. "Red noise" describes the shape of the power spectrum, with pink being between red and white. Also known as "random walk" or "drunkard's walk" noise.

10 seconds of Brown noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Blue noise
Blue spectrum (+3 dB/octave)

Blue noise is also called azure noise. Blue noise's power density increases 3 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to f ) over a finite frequency range.[1][4] In computer graphics, the term "blue noise" is sometimes used more loosely as any noise with minimal low frequency components and no concentrated spikes in energy. This can be good noise for dithering.[5] Retinal cells are arranged in a blue-noise-like pattern which yields good visual resolution.[6][5]

10 seconds of blue noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Violet noise
Violet spectrum (+6 dB/octave)

Violet noise is also called purple noise. Violet noise's power density increases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency[1][7][8] (density proportional to f 2) over a finite frequency range. It is also known as differentiated white noise, due to its being the result of the differentiation of a white noise signal.

10 seconds of violet noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Grey noise
Grey spectrum

Grey noise is random white noise subjected to a psychoacoustic equal loudness curve (such as an inverted A-weighting curve) over a given range of frequencies, giving the listener the perception that it is equally loud at all frequencies.[citation needed] This is in contrast to standard white noise which has equal strength over a linear scale of frequencies but is not perceived as being equally loud due to biases in the human equal-loudness contour.

10 seconds of grey noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Unofficial colors

There are also many "unofficial" colors, usually with multiple definitions.
Red noise

A synonym for Brownian noise, as above[9]
A synonym for pink noise, as above[10]

Orange noise

Orange noise is quasi-stationary noise with a finite power spectrum with a finite number of small bands of zero energy dispersed throughout a continuous spectrum. These bands of zero energy are centered about the frequencies of musical notes in whatever scale is of interest. Since all in-tune musical notes are eliminated, the remaining spectrum could be said to consist of sour, citrus, or "orange" notes.[11]
Green noise

"Green noise is supposedly the background noise of the world. A really long term power spectrum averaged over several outdoor sites. Rather like pink noise with a hump added around 500 Hz."[11]
The mid-frequency component of white noise, used in halftone dithering[12]
Bounded Brownian noise

Black noise

Black noise is also called silent noise.

Silence[1]
Noise with a 1/fβ spectrum, where β > 2 (Manfred Schroeder, "Fractals, chaos, power laws"). Used in modeling various environmental processes.[11]
Noise that has a frequency spectrum of predominantly zero power level over all frequencies except for a few narrow bands or spikes. Note: An example of black noise in a facsimile transmission system is the spectrum that might be obtained when scanning a black area in which there are a few random white spots. Thus, in the time domain, a few random pulses occur while scanning.[13]
"The output of an active noise control system which cancels an existing noise, leaving the local environment noise free. The comic book character Iron Man used to have a "black light beam" that could darken a room in this manner, and popular science fiction has a tendency to portray active noise control in this light."[11] The Batman Beyond supervillian Shriek also had a weapon like this, which effectively blocked out all noise.[citation needed]
"As seen in the sales literature for an ultrasonic vermin repeller, black noise with a power density that is constant for a finite frequency range above 20 kHz. More accurately, ultrasonic white noise. This black noise is like the so-called black light with frequencies too high to be sensed, but still capable of affecting the environment."[11]
Noise with a spectrum corresponding to the blackbody radiation (thermal noise).

Noisy white

In telecommunication, the term noisy white has the following meanings:[14]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the white area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a white area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable black spots on the display surface or record medium.

Noisy black

In telecommunication, the term noisy black has the following meanings:[15]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the black area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a black area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable white spots on the display surface or record medium.


Octo and I bought an ionizer for the bedroom, it makes a low db sound similar to white noise. Five minutes after laying down I'm in slobber sleep. chuckle.gif

wonder.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 10:05 AM #11
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-17-2012, 10:01 AM)JayRodney Wrote:  bored.gif Sorry to hear that.

got divorced last summer ,
I have had people offer me sex, if i had 300 dollars
Im to broke lol
no sex for me
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 10:06 AM #12
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-17-2012, 10:03 AM)JayRodney Wrote:  
(07-17-2012, 10:01 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  Pink noise
Pink noise spectrum. Power density falls off at 10 dB/decade (−3 dB/octave).

The frequency spectrum of pink noise is linear in logarithmic space; it has equal power in bands that are proportionally wide.[1][2] This means that pink noise would have equal power in the frequency range from 40 to 60 Hz as in the band from 4000 to 6000 Hz. Since humans hear in such a proportional space, where a doubling of frequency (an octave) is perceived the same regardless of actual frequency (40–60 Hz is heard as the same interval and distance as 4000–6000 Hz), every octave contains the same amount of energy and thus pink noise is often used as a reference signal in audio engineering. The power density, compared with white noise, decreases by 3 dB per octave (density proportional to 1/f ). For this reason, pink noise is often called "1/f noise".

Since there are an infinite number of logarithmic bands at both the low frequency (DC) and high frequency ends of the spectrum, any finite energy spectrum must have less energy than pink noise at both ends. Pink noise is the only power-law spectral density that has this property: all steeper power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the high-frequency end, and all flatter power-law spectra are finite if integrated to the DC, low-frequency limit.

10 seconds of pink noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Brown(ian) noise
Brown spectrum (−6 dB/octave)

In fields that adopt precise definitions, the terminology "red noise", also called Brown noise or Brownian noise, will usually refer to a power density which decreases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to 1/f 2)[1] over a frequency range which does not include DC (in a general sense, does not include a constant component, or value at zero frequency). In areas where terminology is used loosely, "red noise" may refer to any system where power density decreases with increasing frequency.[3]

The first definition can be generated by an algorithm which simulates Brownian motion or by integrating white noise. "Brown" noise is not named for a power spectrum that suggests the colour brown; rather, the name is a corruption of Brownian motion. "Red noise" describes the shape of the power spectrum, with pink being between red and white. Also known as "random walk" or "drunkard's walk" noise.

10 seconds of Brown noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Blue noise
Blue spectrum (+3 dB/octave)

Blue noise is also called azure noise. Blue noise's power density increases 3 dB per octave with increasing frequency (density proportional to f ) over a finite frequency range.[1][4] In computer graphics, the term "blue noise" is sometimes used more loosely as any noise with minimal low frequency components and no concentrated spikes in energy. This can be good noise for dithering.[5] Retinal cells are arranged in a blue-noise-like pattern which yields good visual resolution.[6][5]

10 seconds of blue noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Violet noise
Violet spectrum (+6 dB/octave)

Violet noise is also called purple noise. Violet noise's power density increases 6 dB per octave with increasing frequency[1][7][8] (density proportional to f 2) over a finite frequency range. It is also known as differentiated white noise, due to its being the result of the differentiation of a white noise signal.

10 seconds of violet noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Grey noise
Grey spectrum

Grey noise is random white noise subjected to a psychoacoustic equal loudness curve (such as an inverted A-weighting curve) over a given range of frequencies, giving the listener the perception that it is equally loud at all frequencies.[citation needed] This is in contrast to standard white noise which has equal strength over a linear scale of frequencies but is not perceived as being equally loud due to biases in the human equal-loudness contour.

10 seconds of grey noise
Problems listening to this file? See media help.
Unofficial colors

There are also many "unofficial" colors, usually with multiple definitions.
Red noise

A synonym for Brownian noise, as above[9]
A synonym for pink noise, as above[10]

Orange noise

Orange noise is quasi-stationary noise with a finite power spectrum with a finite number of small bands of zero energy dispersed throughout a continuous spectrum. These bands of zero energy are centered about the frequencies of musical notes in whatever scale is of interest. Since all in-tune musical notes are eliminated, the remaining spectrum could be said to consist of sour, citrus, or "orange" notes.[11]
Green noise

"Green noise is supposedly the background noise of the world. A really long term power spectrum averaged over several outdoor sites. Rather like pink noise with a hump added around 500 Hz."[11]
The mid-frequency component of white noise, used in halftone dithering[12]
Bounded Brownian noise

Black noise

Black noise is also called silent noise.

Silence[1]
Noise with a 1/fβ spectrum, where β > 2 (Manfred Schroeder, "Fractals, chaos, power laws"). Used in modeling various environmental processes.[11]
Noise that has a frequency spectrum of predominantly zero power level over all frequencies except for a few narrow bands or spikes. Note: An example of black noise in a facsimile transmission system is the spectrum that might be obtained when scanning a black area in which there are a few random white spots. Thus, in the time domain, a few random pulses occur while scanning.[13]
"The output of an active noise control system which cancels an existing noise, leaving the local environment noise free. The comic book character Iron Man used to have a "black light beam" that could darken a room in this manner, and popular science fiction has a tendency to portray active noise control in this light."[11] The Batman Beyond supervillian Shriek also had a weapon like this, which effectively blocked out all noise.[citation needed]
"As seen in the sales literature for an ultrasonic vermin repeller, black noise with a power density that is constant for a finite frequency range above 20 kHz. More accurately, ultrasonic white noise. This black noise is like the so-called black light with frequencies too high to be sensed, but still capable of affecting the environment."[11]
Noise with a spectrum corresponding to the blackbody radiation (thermal noise).

Noisy white

In telecommunication, the term noisy white has the following meanings:[14]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the white area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a white area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable black spots on the display surface or record medium.

Noisy black

In telecommunication, the term noisy black has the following meanings:[15]

In facsimile or display systems, such as television, a nonuniformity in the black area of the image, i.e., document or picture, caused by the presence of noise in the received signal.
A signal or signal level that is supposed to represent a black area on the object, but has a noise content sufficient to cause the creation of noticeable white spots on the display surface or record medium.


Octo and I bought an ionizer for the bedroom, it makes a low db sound similar to white noise. Five minutes after laying down I'm in slobber sleep. chuckle.gif

whats black noise do?
07-17-2012, 10:14 AM #13
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
Not suredunno.gif prolly has really loud bass though.

wonder.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 10:20 AM #14
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-17-2012, 10:14 AM)JayRodney Wrote:  Not suredunno.gif prolly has really loud bass though.


so black noise dont have sex?
So all the rappers, rally aint getting sex

rofl



https://accounts.google.com/ServiceLogin...=verifyage

second scene, come to find out, horsedick, dont have a dick rofl
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
07-17-2012, 10:21 AM #15
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 



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