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El Hierro Volcano Ready To Blow?
12-29-2013, 04:02 PM #1
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
Saturday, December 28, 2013

A 5.4 earthquake yesterday marked a change in the small, low-level earthquake swarm that has been a feature of life in the Canary Islands for more than two years. The underwater volcano that appeared just off the coast of El Hierro two years ago has also changed in height, increasing more than four inches in just a couple of days.

This rapid inflation is increasing in pace, while harmonic tremors have been recorded, and they also are increasing as the day moves on. Both the rise in height and the increasing harmonic tremor indicates that magma is moving into the system and that the pressure is building within the volcano.

http://www.activistpost.com/2013/12/the-...-blow.html
12-29-2013, 04:07 PM #2
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,017 Threads:1,474 Joined:Feb 2011
Uh oh. damned.gif That could end very badly in a worst case scenario.
12-29-2013, 04:18 PM #3
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
I never heard of a harmonic tremor.

Harmonic tremor describes a long-duration release of seismic energy, with distinct spectral (harmonic) lines, that often precedes or accompanies a volcanic eruption. More generally, a volcanic tremor is a sustained signal that may or may not possess these harmonic spectral features.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harmonic_tremor
12-29-2013, 04:20 PM #4
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
No new earthquakes occurred since yesterday. The seismic signals at all stations at the same time show a slight increase in what might be weak tremor or wind and ocean-wave noise.
The latest GPS deformation measurements show that some new inflation and NE displacement occurred in the northern parts of the island (HI01, HI00 and FRON stations).
The other areas and in particular those with most deformation so far (up to 9 cm uplift in the SE part, HI08 and HI09) continue their trend at reduced rate or seem to stagnate.
All in all, there is no indication right now that an eruption might be imminent. Most of the times magma intrudes from deeper reservoirs into volcanic systems, the magma remains at depth to form sills and dikes and never erupts, but if this will be the case with the current crisis is impossible to say at the moment.

It has since calmed down again.

http://www.volcanodiscovery.com/elhierro...ivity.html

Info on past activity can be found here

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12-29-2013, 04:21 PM #5
j browsing Member
Posts:5,158 Threads:1,098 Joined:Jul 2012
(12-29-2013, 04:07 PM)Octo Wrote:  Uh oh. damned.gif That could end very badly in a worst case scenario.
uh oh is right !!!!!!damned.gif

"when life gives you lemons..throw them at someone"...Grumpy Cat good.png
12-29-2013, 04:36 PM #6
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
(12-29-2013, 04:07 PM)Octo Wrote:  Uh oh. damned.gif That could end very badly in a worst case scenario.

Not trying to fearmonger here but just to let you know what a worse case scenario could be. It has happened before by the way.

slands of volcanic origin, such as the Canaries, have an especially large potential for triggering a tsunami. That the Canaries constitute a danger was shown 300 000 years ago when a part of the island El Hierro slid into the sea, triggering a mega-tsunami which carried rocks as high as a house for many hundreds of metres into the interior of the east coast of what is today the USA. The danger of a similar island collapse is seen by scientists particularly at the island of La Palma in the Canaries. Here, following a volcanic eruption in 1949 almost half of the mountain range of 20 km moved westwards towards the sea, leaving a large tear in the volcanic basalt. In the event of a fresh eruption, a huge part of the volcano could loosen itself due to differences in the types of rock and diverse water deposits within the now active volcano. As a result, the densely populated east coast of America would be massively threatened. According to a computer simulation by Stephen N. Ward and Simon Day, a tsunami (purple-red on the graphics) would rush across the Atlantic if the slopes of the Cumbre Vieja.volcano were to collapse into the sea.

http://www.tsunami-alarm-system.com/en/p...ocean.html








Q[/video]

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12-29-2013, 04:50 PM #7
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
Interesting vids Nodoom, thank you, particularily the fault on la Palma. I guess that's the reason they fear a massive landslide. 1.2 trillion tons of rock blink.gif
12-29-2013, 04:52 PM #8
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
(12-29-2013, 04:50 PM)Shadow Wrote:  Interesting vids Nodoom, thank you, particularily the fault on la Palma. I guess that's the reason they fear a massive landslide. 1.2 trillion tons of rock blink.gif

You are welcome. hug.gif

Life is like a penny, you can spend it on what you like, but you can ONLY spend it once.


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12-29-2013, 05:03 PM #9
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,017 Threads:1,474 Joined:Feb 2011
Quote:Geologists Dr. Simon Day and Dr. Steven Neal Ward consider that a megatsunami could be generated during a future eruption involving the Cumbre Vieja on the volcanic ocean island of La Palma, in the Canary Islands, Spain.[17][18]

In 1949, this volcano erupted at its Duraznero, Hoyo Negro and San Juan vents. During the eruption, an earthquake occurred with an epicentre near the village of Jedy. The following day Rubio Bonelli, a local geologist, visited the summit area and discovered that a fissure about 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) long had opened on the eastern side of the summit. As a result, the western half of the volcano (which is the volcanically active arm of a triple-armed rift) had slipped about 2 metres (6.6 ft) downwards and 1 metre (3.3 ft) westwards towards the Atlantic Ocean,[19]

The Cumbre Vieja volcano is currently in a dormant stage, but will almost certainly erupt again. Day and Ward hypothesize[17][18] that if such an eruption causes the western flank to fail, a megatsunami will be generated.

La Palma is currently the most volcanically active island in the Canary Islands Archipelago. It is likely that several eruptions would be required before failure would occur on Cumbre Vieja.[17][18] However, the western half of the volcano has an approximate volume of 500 cubic kilometres (120 cu mi) and an estimated mass of 1,500,000,000,000 metric tons (1.7×1012 short tons). If it were to catastrophically slide into the ocean, it could generate a wave with an initial height of about 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) at the island, and a likely height of around 50 metres (164 ft) at the Caribbean and the Eastern North American seaboard when it runs ashore eight or more hours later. Tens of millions of lives could be lost in the cities and/or towns of St. John's, Boston, Halifax, New York, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Miami, Havana, and many other cities on the Atlantic coast in Europe, South America and Africa.[17][18] The likelihood of this happening is a matter of vigorous debate.[20]

The last Cumbre Vieja eruption occurred in 1971 at the southern end of the sub-aerial section without any movement. The section affected by the 1949 eruption is currently stationary and does not appear to have moved since the initial rupture.[21]

Geologists and volcanologists also disagree about whether an eruption on the Cumbre Vieja would cause a single large gravitational landslide or a series of smaller landslides.[22]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatsunami#Canary_Islands

hiding.gif
12-29-2013, 06:01 PM #10
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
(12-29-2013, 05:03 PM)Octo Wrote:  
Quote:Geologists Dr. Simon Day and Dr. Steven Neal Ward consider that a megatsunami could be generated during a future eruption involving the Cumbre Vieja on the volcanic ocean island of La Palma, in the Canary Islands, Spain.[17][18]

In 1949, this volcano erupted at its Duraznero, Hoyo Negro and San Juan vents. During the eruption, an earthquake occurred with an epicentre near the village of Jedy. The following day Rubio Bonelli, a local geologist, visited the summit area and discovered that a fissure about 2.5 kilometres (1.6 mi) long had opened on the eastern side of the summit. As a result, the western half of the volcano (which is the volcanically active arm of a triple-armed rift) had slipped about 2 metres (6.6 ft) downwards and 1 metre (3.3 ft) westwards towards the Atlantic Ocean,[19]

The Cumbre Vieja volcano is currently in a dormant stage, but will almost certainly erupt again. Day and Ward hypothesize[17][18] that if such an eruption causes the western flank to fail, a megatsunami will be generated.

La Palma is currently the most volcanically active island in the Canary Islands Archipelago. It is likely that several eruptions would be required before failure would occur on Cumbre Vieja.[17][18] However, the western half of the volcano has an approximate volume of 500 cubic kilometres (120 cu mi) and an estimated mass of 1,500,000,000,000 metric tons (1.7×1012 short tons). If it were to catastrophically slide into the ocean, it could generate a wave with an initial height of about 1,000 metres (3,300 ft) at the island, and a likely height of around 50 metres (164 ft) at the Caribbean and the Eastern North American seaboard when it runs ashore eight or more hours later. Tens of millions of lives could be lost in the cities and/or towns of St. John's, Boston, Halifax, New York, Baltimore, Washington, D.C., Miami, Havana, and many other cities on the Atlantic coast in Europe, South America and Africa.[17][18] The likelihood of this happening is a matter of vigorous debate.[20]

The last Cumbre Vieja eruption occurred in 1971 at the southern end of the sub-aerial section without any movement. The section affected by the 1949 eruption is currently stationary and does not appear to have moved since the initial rupture.[21]

Geologists and volcanologists also disagree about whether an eruption on the Cumbre Vieja would cause a single large gravitational landslide or a series of smaller landslides.[22]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Megatsunami#Canary_Islands

hiding.gif

And to think I live on a small (relatively) island. damned.gif

Life is like a penny, you can spend it on what you like, but you can ONLY spend it once.


https://twitter.com/NigelLondon2014

12-29-2013, 06:13 PM #11
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(12-29-2013, 06:01 PM)NODOOM Wrote:  And to think I live on a small (relatively) island. damned.gif

Wouldn't be pretty for the UK, no. There's always some potential though the chances are quite slim, but bears watching.
12-29-2013, 08:08 PM #12
Wayne5 Member
Posts:660 Threads:61 Joined:Nov 2013
How many nuke power plants are on the coast? damned.gif
12-29-2013, 11:04 PM #13
Softy Incognito Anonymous
 
(12-29-2013, 08:08 PM)Wayne5 Wrote:  How many nuke power plants are on the coast? damned.gif

Now there is a good question...

probably a couple of them...

(:X
12-29-2013, 11:30 PM #14
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,017 Threads:1,474 Joined:Feb 2011
There seems to be a few of them yes. damned.gif


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