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Electrical brain stimulation can help with stroke recovery and more
03-17-2016, 06:13 PM #1
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,142 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
Quote:“This is important because it could either indicate that some parts of these nerve cells are able to regenerate, or these nerve cells try to form alternative pathways to reroute the traffic in the brain to a different route from the one that has been destroyed by the stroke,” he told CTV News.

Stroke patients in Canada can't get TDCS therapy outside of a research study. But with several studies underway around the world, scientists hope they'll be able to quickly confirm that brain stimulation has the power to accelerate stroke recovery.

http://www.theloop.ca/ctvnews/electrical...oke-study/

I hope they can quickly confirm this as an effective therapy. So, impressive, so hopeful.
03-17-2016, 06:33 PM #2
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,253 Threads:1,479 Joined:Feb 2011
That's interesting, I hope it works as described
03-17-2016, 06:51 PM #3
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,142 Threads:428 Joined:Jun 2012
Also, new studies point to electrical brain stimulation to alleviate depression, which I would assume is another debilitating condition after one suffers a stroke. So, maybe, they should merge these two studies together and tackle two problems at once. Although, I would hope they could stimulate the vagus nerve without having to surgically implant any device.

Quote:“Sometimes the antidepressant drugs work in concert with the stimulator, but it appears to us that when people get better, it is the vagus nerve stimulator that is doing the heavy lifting,” Conway explains. “Stimulation seems to be responsible for most of the improvement we see.”

Furthermore, the PET scans showed that structures deeper in the brain also begin to change several months after nerve stimulation begins. Many of those structures have high concentrations of brain cells that release dopamine.

There is growing evidence that problems in dopamine pathways may be especially important in treatment-resistant depression, said Conway.

The finding that vagus nerve stimulators influence those pathways may explain why the therapy can help and why, when it does work, its effects are long-lasting. Patients who respond to vagus nerve stimulation tend to get better and to stay better.

“We hypothesized that something significant had to be occurring in the brain, and our research seems to back that up,” he said.

http://psychcentral.com/news/2013/05/07/...54607.html



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