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Ethanol mess with your car’s engine? You may be on your own
05-11-2011, 01:58 PM #1
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
I have no post to verify this. Heard this from several sources that the reason US Government is wanting to raise ethanol percentage from 10-15% is the Gubmant subsidizing the corn. Problem is The American People have reduced fuel consumption which has increased their inventory of corn so their reasoning is to keep farmers happy and just raise ethanol content and problem solved.

http://fuelfix.com/blog/2011/05/10/ethan...-your-own/

Except ethanol is harder on you car engine, efficiency is less so the government makes more money when you buy more gasoline. Not to mention car manufactures are voiding warranties if EA 15 is used.

Big Oil makes about $0.07/gallon of gas while the US Government makes $0.184/gallon. That's just Federal Gasoline Tax then add state Tax for example Texas State Gasoline Tax at $0.20/gallon. That's $0.384/gallon taxes for each gallon of gasoline sold (For Road Transportation). Now tell me that there is incentive to lower fuel consumption by the US Gubmunt...
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05-11-2011, 02:03 PM #2
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
That's just gasoline, Diesel is much higher taxed...
05-11-2011, 02:06 PM #3
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,582 Threads:1,566 Joined:Feb 2011
In an era where we are warned about potential food shortages, leading to as some sources claim; food riots, martial law & FEMA camp it would seem logical to allow corn to be produced for food.

Hemp has a lot going for it as a fuel.

Rudolf Diesel, the inventor of the diesel engine, designed it to run on vegetable and seed oils like hemp; he actually ran the thing on peanut oil for the 1900 World's Fair. Henry Ford used hemp to not only construct cars but also fuel them.

As an alternative to methanol, hemp has at least one glowing report: the plant produces up to four times more cellulose per acre than trees. And a hemp crop grows a little quicker than a forest.

As for an alternative to petroleum,

• Hemp grows like mad from border to border in America; so shortages are unlikely. And, unlike petrol, unless we run out of soil, hemp is renewable.

• Growing and harvesting the stuff has much less environmental impact than procuring oil.

• Hemp fuel is biodegradable; so oil spills become fertilizer not eco-catastrophes.

• Hemp fuel does not contribute to sulfur dioxide air poisoning.

• Other noxious emissions like carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are radically slashed by using “biodiesel.”

• Hemp fuel is nontoxic and only a mild skin irritant; anybody who’s ever cleaned out an old carburetor with gasoline can confirm the same is not true for petrol.

• Growing hemp for fuel would be a tremendous boon for American farmers and the agricultural industry, as opposed to people like, say, the Bush family.

wonder.gif
05-11-2011, 02:39 PM #4
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,015 Threads:1,477 Joined:Feb 2011
EU introduced the new E10 fuel here this year. It has higher amounts of ethanol and people don't trust it very much. Many gas stations in Finland stopped selling it as nobody was buying dunno.gif

Quote:Petteri Kämpjärvi, head of sales at Neste Oil, says that 60 per cent of the petrol sold in Finland is E10, and 40 per cent is 98-octane fuel. Before the beginning of this year, the share of 98 octane gas was just seven per cent.

http://www.hs.fi/english/article/E10+pet...5264370350
05-11-2011, 03:08 PM #5
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
(05-11-2011, 02:06 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  In an era where we are warned about potential food shortages, leading to as some sources claim; food riots, martial law & FEMA camp it would seem logical to allow corn to be produced for food.

Hemp has a lot going for it as a fuel.

Rudolf Diesel, the inventor of the diesel engine, designed it to run on vegetable and seed oils like hemp; he actually ran the thing on peanut oil for the 1900 World's Fair. Henry Ford used hemp to not only construct cars but also fuel them.

As an alternative to methanol, hemp has at least one glowing report: the plant produces up to four times more cellulose per acre than trees. And a hemp crop grows a little quicker than a forest.

As for an alternative to petroleum,

• Hemp grows like mad from border to border in America; so shortages are unlikely. And, unlike petrol, unless we run out of soil, hemp is renewable.

• Growing and harvesting the stuff has much less environmental impact than procuring oil.

• Hemp fuel is biodegradable; so oil spills become fertilizer not eco-catastrophes.

• Hemp fuel does not contribute to sulfur dioxide air poisoning.

• Other noxious emissions like carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons are radically slashed by using “biodiesel.”

• Hemp fuel is nontoxic and only a mild skin irritant; anybody who’s ever cleaned out an old carburetor with gasoline can confirm the same is not true for petrol.

• Growing hemp for fuel would be a tremendous boon for American farmers and the agricultural industry, as opposed to people like, say, the Bush family.

What is the efficiency of hemp? btu's? Lets face it JR, people want cheap and the hydrocarbon is the cheapest and most efficient for vehicle fuel we have at this time. I have always said that fuel diversification is the way out of this mess. It's going to take time. Hell 1-man in England ran his ICE powered vehicle on chicken shït as he was a chicken farmer. Just makes methane with a nasty aroma. Smelled like chicken crap chuckle.gif

Was good for him as he already had to clean out the chicken coops and handled it 1-time. But for the average businessman he would be hard pressed to get up in the morning, put on his coat and tie, have a cup of coffee then out the door to shovel a load of chickenshit in his car.

A close friend of mine is a Geophysicist for Conoco Phillips. They have/or had a contract with Tyson Farms collecting all their chicken fat refining that into biodiesel. When I see him I'd ask how the chicken fat business was doing. At 1st he was aggravated with me but later took it well and laughed about it himself.
-----------------------------------------------

What I am trying to say about fuel diversification is not every fuel source fits each type of driving need. I'm not redneck but I do like driving my V-8 powered pickup. Mashing the gas and having the ability to accelerate at a decent rate. I rented a Toyota Prius 1-time. Took a couple people out to lunch, Toyota should have called it a Pray-Us as I prayed evry time I pulled out on the road that thing would get enough speed built up so I did not get run over by a big SUV...
05-11-2011, 03:37 PM #6
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:13,525 Threads:1,259 Joined:Feb 2011
Hemp biomass has a heating value of 5000-8000 BTU/lb. Not sure what hydrocarbons are.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-11-2011, 04:13 PM #7
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
Hemp is the largest biomass producer on the planet. In four months, it can produce 10 tons of plant material. By using pyrolysis (charcoaling) or biochemical composting, biomass can be converted into methanol and used as a fuel source. Not only can we use the biomass to make methanol, but hemp oil can be used to make biodiesel.

“It would only take 6% of our U.S. land to produce enough hemp for hemp fuel, to make us energy independent from the rest of the world,” reports the organization It’s Inevitable, Hemp based in Fort Collins, Colorado.

Fuel, upon combustion, creates CO2 and H2O which is released into the atmosphere, balancing the carbon cycle. Using hemp as a renewable fuel source can decrease our dependence on foreign oil and reduce our greenhouse gas emissions. We can also employ U.S. farmers to produce hemp, a crop that requires no weeding, nor fertilizer or pesticides.

The United States is the only industrialized nation where it is illegal to grow industrial hemp. With so many beneficial uses, how can we justify the fact that it is illegal?
05-11-2011, 09:35 PM #8
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
"
Other Disadvantages
The entire point of using biofuels is to eliminate carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO) and other harmful emissions from cars, electrical plants and industry. Although the burning of biofuels produces dramatically fewer emissions, it still results in CO2 production.

Because of the high cost of manufacturing biofuels, the price per gallon is considerably more than that of gasoline. Considering the cost of converting a vehicle to biofuel use in addition to the higher fuel price, few people will voluntarily make the switch from petroleum to biodiesel. The manufacture of biofuels produces a very strong, offensive odor. For the American economy to convert from petroleum to biofuel, we would need manufacturing plants in virtually every metropolitan area in the country. The air might be less polluted, but it would smell much worse.



Read more: The Disadvantages of Hemp Biofuel | eHow.co.uk http://www.ehow.co.uk/list_7653486_disad...z1M4PTmrrP"

http://www.ehow.co.uk/list_7653486_disad...ofuel.html

Again it seems the price and odor is the con in using hemp as a fuel source. Although interesting enough...

coffeetime.gif
05-11-2011, 09:39 PM #9
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
However, there was a man using biodiesel in his modified truck living down the street. When he drove by it smelled like the inside of a Hooters restaurant. Huba huba...

:fuckineh:
05-11-2011, 09:58 PM #10
Tacolover II Member
Posts:443 Threads:64 Joined:Feb 2011
(05-11-2011, 03:37 PM)Shadow Wrote:  Hemp biomass has a heating value of 5000-8000 BTU/lb. Not sure what hydrocarbons are.

115-125,000 btu's/gallon of gasoline. 1-gallon of gasoline equates to around 6 lbs/gallon.
so 1-lb of gasoline equates to approximately 20,834 btu's

Plus much cheaper to make/refine. Not to mention all the other petroleum based products including jet fuels and plastics...



05-12-2011, 02:12 AM #11
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:9,999 Threads:609 Joined:Feb 2011
Speaking of hemp, ever read this book?


.

 
And the people bowed and prayed
To the neon god they made



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