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Give Peace a Chance—In Space
01-17-2013, 04:12 AM #1
KILLUMINATI Made Ya Look!!
Posts:4,764 Threads:1,046 Joined:Jun 2012
The White House Death Star petition was a joke, but the prospect of war in outer space is anything but.

İmage

"The wars of the future will not be fought on the battlefield or at sea," a military academy commandant voiced by Willem Dafoe intones toward the end of a now-classic 1997 episode of The Simpsons. "They will be fought in space, or possibly on top of a very tall mountain." This was meant as a joke, but the latter half of that statement would soon prove eerily prescient when India and Pakistan battled over Kashmir's Siachen glacier -- a strategically irrelevant ice field sitting over 18,000 feet above sea level -- during the Kargil War in 1999. For now, the prospect of military conflict in outer space still resides in the realm of dystopia or absurdity, to the point that a White House petition demanding the construction of a Star Wars-style "Death Star" could be treated as a harmless prank. In rejecting the petition this week, the White House rightly wondered why a debt-strapped U.S. government would spend $850 quadrillion on a weapons system "with a fundamental flaw that can be exploited by a one-man starship." Thankfully, the prospect of an orbital space-to-earth battlestation doesn't even need to be treated seriously.

But it wasn't always this way. In 1952, the eminent rocket scientist Werner Von Braun imagined that a future space station would function as an orbital nuclear platform. Space historians believe that Russia's Salyut 3 space station, which was launched in June of 1974, had a cannon on board, in case a craft or satellite from an enemy country attempted to disrupt its mission. The Soviet Union experimented with Fractional Orbital Bombardment Systems in the 1960s and 70s -- basically nuclear delivery systems that were capable of orbiting the earth. The U.S. even detonated a nuclear weapon over 200 miles above the Pacific Ocean in July of 1962, an incident known as Starfish Prime that, according to Harvard University astrophysicist Jonathan McDowell, halved the useful lifetime of all satellites then in orbit, knocked out power in Hawaii, created an artificial Van Allen Belt that persisted for five years, and released radiation into the atmosphere that wouldn't fully dissipate until the end of the decade. For a time, it was all but taken for granted that space would not only be militarized, but weaponized -- used as a venue or staging area for violent clashes between space-faring nations, or attacks on the surface of the earth. Space war wasn't a punch line, but a possibility that nuclear-armed powers didn't think they could afford to ignore.

The results of the Starfish event hint at one reason why that changed. "This is a great weapon. It does a lot of damage -- but it also killed everything you had yourself," McDowell says of the results of the high-altitude nuclear test. War in space was sure to have a cataclysmic effect on the country with the most space assets, regardless of the end result.

But what about war from space? For powerful space-faring countries, space-to-earth or earth-to-space combat is about as practical as it is desirable -- which is to say, not very. "Space is incredibly useful for the military for a lot of things," McDowell explains. "It's great for intelligence, communication and navigation. The natural thing is to ask, 'where are my X-Wing fighters?' The fact is that it's hard to find a rationale for them."

read more: http://www.theatlantic.com/international...ce/267223/
01-17-2013, 06:59 PM #2
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,179 Threads:429 Joined:Jun 2012
Quote:He pointed out that an electromagnetic pulse will cover a wide geographic area within line of sight to the nuclear weapon and produce significant damage to critical infrastructures that support “the fabric of U.S. society and the ability of the United States and Western nations to project influence and military power.”
Read more at http://www.wnd.com/2012/12/weapon-in-the...hP2kXUI.99

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01-17-2013, 07:29 PM #3
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,572 Threads:1,443 Joined:Feb 2011
It's my understanding the Van Allen belts may never return to normal after Starfish. Dumbest ğkking thing ever done.
Hey let's blow them suckers to smithereens just to see what happens.
Just like HAARP, granted a patent based on a tech that boils the ionosphere.
I came up with a way to boil the earths oceans dry in an hour with a microwave and a transistor radio, I'm not letting the military anywhere near it. coffeetime.gif

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01-17-2013, 07:42 PM #4
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,179 Threads:429 Joined:Jun 2012
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01-17-2013, 10:00 PM #5
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
We tried it here and it failed. We should have learned our lesson.
01-17-2013, 10:16 PM #6
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
(01-17-2013, 07:29 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  It's my understanding the Van Allen belts may never return to normal after Starfish. Dumbest ƒükking thing ever done.
Hey let's blow them suckers to smithereens just to see what happens.
Just like HAARP, granted a patent based on a tech that boils the ionosphere.
I came up with a way to boil the earths oceans dry in an hour with a microwave and a transistor radio, I'm not letting the military anywhere near it. coffeetime.gif


The Mev (high energy) electrons only had a lifetime of 5 years. But it did take out a third of the LEO satellites.

Given that almost all we know about EMP came from that explosion it was probably worthwhile. The Cd-109 tracer in the weapon helped work out the seasonal mixing rate of polar and tropical air masses.

It's not like we did an antisatellite test against an object in high LEO orbit...
http://celestrak.com/events/asat.asp

And that wasn't good enough so they are going to try again:
http://blogs.defensenews.com/intercepts/...month-ucs/

"Sigh", we are close to making space permanently unusable (there is a tipping point where there is so much debris in LEO that it becomes a self-perpetuating meat grinder) except for heavily armored pass-through payloads.
01-17-2013, 10:44 PM #7
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,572 Threads:1,443 Joined:Feb 2011
Quote:As explained in the Encyclopedia Britannica: "... Starfish made a much wider belt [than Project Argus] that extends from low altitude out past L=3 [i.e. three earth radiuses or about 13,000 km above the surface of the earth]." Later in 1962, the USSR undertook similar planetary experiments, creating three new radiation belts between 7,000 and 13,000 km above the earth.

According to the Encyclopedia, the electron fluxes in the lower Van Allen Belt have changed markedly since the 1962 high- altitude nuclear explosions by the US and USSR, never returning to their former state. According to American scientists, it could take many hundreds of years for the Van Allen Belts to destabilize at their normal levels. (Research done by: Nigel Harle, Borderland Archives, Cortenbachstraat 32, 6136 CH Sittard, Netherlands.)

http://agriculturedefensecoalition.org/s...ertell.pdf

Some interesting reading here courtesy Google scholar, this was what I was referring to.

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