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Had two blackouts today.
06-07-2013, 02:07 PM #16
White Ribbon call me
Posts:9,779 Threads:371 Joined:Apr 2013
one of my friends is Aussie/Finn.. and her mother is the real deal from Finland (with broken English)and we were at a Christmas night party at my friends house, so her mother was there.. i used to do hair..and she said in front of everyone, when she was introduced to me "ah yes, you're the one that gives good head"

chuckle.gif
06-07-2013, 02:09 PM #17
Blather Member
Posts:153 Threads:3 Joined:Jun 2013
(06-07-2013, 01:48 PM)Octo Wrote:  Yes I am a native Finn. My parents, grandparents etc. were all born here.

You would really appreciate a sauna I tell you. Anyone in a cool climate would. But not an electric one, it has to be wood-fired. Besides, when you have another blackout and you need heat and warm water it's a great solution.

There are about 5 million people in Finland and over 2 million saunas. Everybody has access to a sauna.
Quote:Taking a sauna begins by washing oneself up and then going to sit for some time in the hot room, typically warmed to 80–110 °C (176–230 °F). Water is thrown on the hot stones topping the kiuas, a special stove used to warm up the sauna. This produces steam, known as löyly, which increases the moisture and heat within the sauna. The word löyly is used for this steam only in the context of the sauna and not the word höyry ('steam, vapour'). Its original meaning was 'spirit, breath, soul' and it is still seen in the Uralic languages, for example, Udmurt lul, Komi lol, Mansi läl 'life', Khanty lil and Hungarian lélek.[5] Occasionally one uses leafy, fragrant boughs of silver birch called vihta in West Finland and vasta in East Finland to gently beat oneself. This has a relaxing effect on the muscles and also helps in calming the effects of mosquito bites. When the heat begins to feel uncomfortable it is customary to jump into a lake, sea, or a swimming pool, or to have a shower. In the winter rolling in the snow or even swimming in a hole cut in the ice, an avanto, is sometimes used as a substitute. Often after the sauna it is a custom to sit down in the dressing room or the porch of the sauna to enjoy a sausage, along with beer or soft drinks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_sauna

It took JR some getting used to, but he loves it now. chuckle.gif


I'd love to see it take off here but we don't get a lot of northern Europeans in Australia. I got no building skills either :(

Taught myself how to use a chainsaw from da manual, but I think that's about as far as I can go. My place is a dump really, it's a liveable demolition prospect on 16 acres, so you don't really spend money on the house if you can avoid it.
06-07-2013, 02:10 PM #18
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
(06-07-2013, 02:07 PM)the white ribbon Wrote:  one of my friends is Aussie/Finn.. and her mother is the real deal from Finland (with broken English)and we were at a Christmas night party at my friends house, so her mother was there.. i used to do hair..and she said in front of everyone, when she was introduced to me "ah yes, you're the one that gives good head"

chuckle.gif


lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif

That's priceless! I'm sure you agreed. rofl.gif
06-07-2013, 02:12 PM #19
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,861 Threads:1,453 Joined:Feb 2011
(06-07-2013, 02:07 PM)the white ribbon Wrote:  one of my friends is Aussie/Finn.. and her mother is the real deal from Finland (with broken English)and we were at a Christmas night party at my friends house, so her mother was there.. i used to do hair..and she said in front of everyone, when she was introduced to me "ah yes, you're the one that gives good head"

chuckle.gif


lmao.gif Cleaning up the snot bubble I blew on the keyboard is gonna' be a pain.

wonder.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
06-07-2013, 02:20 PM #20
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
blather here, can't be bothered logging in.

Funneh story WR.

You have great English, Octo.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
06-07-2013, 02:21 PM #21
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
blather again:

Tell us about when you used to be a hairdresser WR.
06-07-2013, 02:26 PM #22
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
(06-07-2013, 02:09 PM)Blather Wrote:  
(06-07-2013, 01:48 PM)Octo Wrote:  Yes I am a native Finn. My parents, grandparents etc. were all born here.

You would really appreciate a sauna I tell you. Anyone in a cool climate would. But not an electric one, it has to be wood-fired. Besides, when you have another blackout and you need heat and warm water it's a great solution.

There are about 5 million people in Finland and over 2 million saunas. Everybody has access to a sauna.
Quote:Taking a sauna begins by washing oneself up and then going to sit for some time in the hot room, typically warmed to 80–110 °C (176–230 °F). Water is thrown on the hot stones topping the kiuas, a special stove used to warm up the sauna. This produces steam, known as löyly, which increases the moisture and heat within the sauna. The word löyly is used for this steam only in the context of the sauna and not the word höyry ('steam, vapour'). Its original meaning was 'spirit, breath, soul' and it is still seen in the Uralic languages, for example, Udmurt lul, Komi lol, Mansi läl 'life', Khanty lil and Hungarian lélek.[5] Occasionally one uses leafy, fragrant boughs of silver birch called vihta in West Finland and vasta in East Finland to gently beat oneself. This has a relaxing effect on the muscles and also helps in calming the effects of mosquito bites. When the heat begins to feel uncomfortable it is customary to jump into a lake, sea, or a swimming pool, or to have a shower. In the winter rolling in the snow or even swimming in a hole cut in the ice, an avanto, is sometimes used as a substitute. Often after the sauna it is a custom to sit down in the dressing room or the porch of the sauna to enjoy a sausage, along with beer or soft drinks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_sauna

It took JR some getting used to, but he loves it now. chuckle.gif


I'd love to see it take off here but we don't get a lot of northern Europeans in Australia. I got no building skills either :(

Taught myself how to use a chainsaw from da manual, but I think that's about as far as I can go. My place is a dump really, it's a liveable demolition prospect on 16 acres, so you don't really spend money on the house if you can avoid it.


Yeah I hear you, it's an investment for sure.

Here's a pic of our sauna out in the wilderness. This is when we had just painted it a few years back. They come IKEA style, so you assemble the thing yourself. I think the sauna in the pic was a bit over five thousand euros, everything included.

İmage
06-07-2013, 02:27 PM #23
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
(06-07-2013, 02:20 PM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  You have great English, Octo.


Thank you hug.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
06-07-2013, 02:30 PM #24
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(06-07-2013, 02:26 PM)Octo Wrote:  
(06-07-2013, 02:09 PM)Blather Wrote:  
(06-07-2013, 01:48 PM)Octo Wrote:  Yes I am a native Finn. My parents, grandparents etc. were all born here.

You would really appreciate a sauna I tell you. Anyone in a cool climate would. But not an electric one, it has to be wood-fired. Besides, when you have another blackout and you need heat and warm water it's a great solution.

There are about 5 million people in Finland and over 2 million saunas. Everybody has access to a sauna.
Quote:Taking a sauna begins by washing oneself up and then going to sit for some time in the hot room, typically warmed to 80–110 °C (176–230 °F). Water is thrown on the hot stones topping the kiuas, a special stove used to warm up the sauna. This produces steam, known as löyly, which increases the moisture and heat within the sauna. The word löyly is used for this steam only in the context of the sauna and not the word höyry ('steam, vapour'). Its original meaning was 'spirit, breath, soul' and it is still seen in the Uralic languages, for example, Udmurt lul, Komi lol, Mansi läl 'life', Khanty lil and Hungarian lélek.[5] Occasionally one uses leafy, fragrant boughs of silver birch called vihta in West Finland and vasta in East Finland to gently beat oneself. This has a relaxing effect on the muscles and also helps in calming the effects of mosquito bites. When the heat begins to feel uncomfortable it is customary to jump into a lake, sea, or a swimming pool, or to have a shower. In the winter rolling in the snow or even swimming in a hole cut in the ice, an avanto, is sometimes used as a substitute. Often after the sauna it is a custom to sit down in the dressing room or the porch of the sauna to enjoy a sausage, along with beer or soft drinks.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finnish_sauna

It took JR some getting used to, but he loves it now. chuckle.gif


I'd love to see it take off here but we don't get a lot of northern Europeans in Australia. I got no building skills either :(

Taught myself how to use a chainsaw from da manual, but I think that's about as far as I can go. My place is a dump really, it's a liveable demolition prospect on 16 acres, so you don't really spend money on the house if you can avoid it.


Yeah I hear you, it's an investment for sure.

Here's a pic of our sauna out in the wilderness. This is when we had just painted it a few years back. They come IKEA style, so you assemble the thing yourself. I think the sauna in the pic was a bit over five thousand euros, everything included.

İmage


(blather again)

Droool.
06-07-2013, 02:34 PM #25
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
I don't blame you. chuckle.gif The sauna faces the lake, so if you take a bath late at night you can see the moon rise and reflect in the water. It's like meditation. cheers.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
06-07-2013, 02:43 PM #26
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(blather again)

ooooh,and a lake too! I don't have a dam cos they attract snakes here.

So is drinking huuge there? That's my impression of the northern Europeans. I'd have to say alcohol is warming in cool climates. One doesn't necessarily drink to get drunk one drinks to warms one's innards. yuh?
06-07-2013, 03:02 PM #27
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
Yeah you could say drinking is pretty huge here, especially in the summer.

Quote:One doesn't necessarily drink to get drunk

That doesn't apply here. coffeetime.gif

Kidding (a little), I can't party like in ye olde days anymore.
06-07-2013, 03:10 PM #28
Blather Member
Posts:153 Threads:3 Joined:Jun 2013
yeah I met some Swedes and Norwegians when I used to post in Autism support groups (it's something you do when you get dx'ed, then you get tired of all that stuff). Haven't met Finns before.
06-07-2013, 03:15 PM #29
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,698 Threads:1,499 Joined:Feb 2011
Oh I see! Well, we're all good neighbors up here. Finns are supposedly more quiet, but more to the point when they do speak. Also seem to have a darker sense of humor, but I don't know. There are all kinds of people everywhere.

cheers.gif
06-07-2013, 03:20 PM #30
Blather Member
Posts:153 Threads:3 Joined:Jun 2013
:)



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