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Mysterious planet found floating free in space - without a star
11-15-2012, 02:33 PM #1
smart-ass Member
Posts:281 Threads:26 Joined:Jul 2012
http://uk.news.yahoo.com/mysterious-plan...12012.html





A planet has been found wandering through space on its own - without a parent star.

The strange discovery is 100 light-years from Earth, and was spotted using ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope.

Scientists believe these 'free floating' worlds could be common - perhaps as numerous as the billions of 'normal' stars.

The absence of a bright star very close to it, has allowed the team to study the probable planet's atmosphere in great detail - and could provide insights that will allow scientists to study other 'exoplanets' nearer to stars.




Beware of the booger eater he'snot full uhoh.gif
11-15-2012, 02:44 PM #2
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,606 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Rogue planets. damned.gif
11-15-2012, 03:49 PM #3
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,279 Threads:1,438 Joined:Feb 2011
Nibiru! aaah2.gif chuckle.gif

Very interesting. I've noticed lately, the more we find out about space, the less we actually know. From our current model of planetary formation, it would seem logical to assume this was part of a solar system at one point, which brings up an interesting question:
What could possibly make a planet be ejected from it's orbit around a star? That's quite a frighting prospect, at least from my own earthbound point of view.

wonder.gif
11-15-2012, 07:25 PM #4
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,888 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
damned.gif


There's still a slight chance that CFBDSIR2149 is a brown dwarf — a strange object that's larger than a planet but too small to trigger the internal nuclear fusion reactions required to become a full-fledged star. Additional observations should help decide the matter.

"We need new observations to confirm that this object belongs to the AB Doradus moving group," Delorme told SPACE.com via email. "With a good distance measurement and a more accurate proper motion, we will be able to increase (or decrease) the probability that it is indeed a planet."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/1...z2CJEV0wje
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
11-15-2012, 07:25 PM #5
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 

Oh that's God's 8 Ball, always leaves it lying around.
11-15-2012, 07:54 PM #6
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,279 Threads:1,438 Joined:Feb 2011
(11-15-2012, 07:25 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  damned.gif


There's still a slight chance that CFBDSIR2149 is a brown dwarf — a strange object that's larger than a planet but too small to trigger the internal nuclear fusion reactions required to become a full-fledged star. Additional observations should help decide the matter.

"We need new observations to confirm that this object belongs to the AB Doradus moving group," Delorme told SPACE.com via email. "With a good distance measurement and a more accurate proper motion, we will be able to increase (or decrease) the probability that it is indeed a planet."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/1...z2CJEV0wje


How does a planet that's not orbiting a star possess an average temperature of 806 degrees Fahrenheit? 13.gif brown dwarf sounds much more plausible to me. At least earth is in no danger from this, and it's too far to be a binary companion of our sun...
At least from current theory.

wonder.gif
11-15-2012, 07:58 PM #7
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,888 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(11-15-2012, 07:54 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:25 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  damned.gif


There's still a slight chance that CFBDSIR2149 is a brown dwarf — a strange object that's larger than a planet but too small to trigger the internal nuclear fusion reactions required to become a full-fledged star. Additional observations should help decide the matter.

"We need new observations to confirm that this object belongs to the AB Doradus moving group," Delorme told SPACE.com via email. "With a good distance measurement and a more accurate proper motion, we will be able to increase (or decrease) the probability that it is indeed a planet."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/1...z2CJEV0wje


How does a planet that's not orbiting a star possess an average temperature of 806 degrees Fahrenheit? 13.gif brown dwarf sounds much more plausible to me. At least earth is in no danger from this, and it's too far to be a binary companion of our sun...
At least from current theory.


Exactly JR wave.gif I think it may be a brown dwarf too.

http://www.universetoday.com/35664/tempe...e-planets/
11-15-2012, 08:29 PM #8
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
(11-15-2012, 07:58 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:54 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:25 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  damned.gif


There's still a slight chance that CFBDSIR2149 is a brown dwarf — a strange object that's larger than a planet but too small to trigger the internal nuclear fusion reactions required to become a full-fledged star. Additional observations should help decide the matter.

"We need new observations to confirm that this object belongs to the AB Doradus moving group," Delorme told SPACE.com via email. "With a good distance measurement and a more accurate proper motion, we will be able to increase (or decrease) the probability that it is indeed a planet."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/1...z2CJEV0wje


How does a planet that's not orbiting a star possess an average temperature of 806 degrees Fahrenheit? 13.gif brown dwarf sounds much more plausible to me. At least earth is in no danger from this, and it's too far to be a binary companion of our sun...
At least from current theory.


Exactly JR wave.gif I think it may be a brown dwarf too.

http://www.universetoday.com/35664/tempe...e-planets/


I believe it is a planet. At 100 million years old more or less the planet earth was at least as warm. It takes a while to form a crust.

The temperature results from the heat of formation (mostly the conversion of potential energy to thermal energy).
11-15-2012, 08:50 PM #9
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,279 Threads:1,438 Joined:Feb 2011
I'll have to look at the Vegas odds before I place any bets for sure.chuckle.gif From my understanding a star and its planets are thought to form together and share the same age, so if one can determine the age of a star, you also have the ages of its planets.
In this case there is no star per se.
Young, sun-like stars spin fast, then the usual entropy kicks in. I realize the object is THOUGHT to be part of the
AB Doradus Moving Group due to proximity and therefore; assumed to be relatively young object.
However the article also stated there is the possibility that it's moving with the group by chance. This may take a while to sort out for certain, should be interesting to stay up with it.

wonder.gif
11-15-2012, 08:55 PM #10
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,888 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(11-15-2012, 08:29 PM)オタマジャクシ Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:58 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:54 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  
(11-15-2012, 07:25 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  damned.gif


There's still a slight chance that CFBDSIR2149 is a brown dwarf — a strange object that's larger than a planet but too small to trigger the internal nuclear fusion reactions required to become a full-fledged star. Additional observations should help decide the matter.

"We need new observations to confirm that this object belongs to the AB Doradus moving group," Delorme told SPACE.com via email. "With a good distance measurement and a more accurate proper motion, we will be able to increase (or decrease) the probability that it is indeed a planet."



Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/science/2012/11/1...z2CJEV0wje


How does a planet that's not orbiting a star possess an average temperature of 806 degrees Fahrenheit? 13.gif brown dwarf sounds much more plausible to me. At least earth is in no danger from this, and it's too far to be a binary companion of our sun...
At least from current theory.


Exactly JR wave.gif I think it may be a brown dwarf too.

http://www.universetoday.com/35664/tempe...e-planets/


I believe it is a planet. At 100 million years old more or less the planet earth was at least as warm. It takes a while to form a crust.

The temperature results from the heat of formation (mostly the conversion of potential energy to thermal energy).


Now, I don't know. 13.gif

http://www.cfht.hawaii.edu/en/news/RoguePlanet/
11-15-2012, 08:58 PM #11
yankees skier
Posts:5,898 Threads:215 Joined:Feb 2011
Swamp gas. coffeetime.gif

Biere.



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