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Off The Grid Living Tip
01-06-2013, 05:28 PM #1
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
In living off-grid discussions with friends and family, they all bascially keep bringing up the cons of living off the grid, the main reasons being the lack of solar or wind energy being always there at the flick of a switch[/quote]. So, I'm looking for tips...here's a good one...

Quote:He sold his propane cook stove and installed a wood cook stove, and ran a loop from his hot water tank through both his cook stove and woodstove, so none of his hot water comes from propane anymore.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/happy-hom...z2HCjC0O00
Quote: I’m thankful that this weekend my home will be toasty warm, heated by sustainably-cut firewood from my amazing 150 acres and burned in an energy-efficient secondary combustion woodstove which burns exceptionally cleanly and really emits only the carbon that the tree extracted from the air and stored during its lifetime. I’m thankful that we still have enough sun at this time of year that our showers and baths will be heated by the sun hitting my Enerworks solar domestic hot water heater, which transfers that heat to my hot water tank. I am fortunate that professor Steve Harrison at the Queen’s Solar Lab had the time and money and expertise to engineer this wondrous system, and that Canadian taxpayers had the foresight to provide seed money to Enerworks to commercialize it.

Read more: http://www.motherearthnews.com/blogs/blo...z2HCmOB8JZ[quote]

http://www.cammather.com/category/home-heating

Heating water for the bath.

İmage
01-06-2013, 05:33 PM #2
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
We had something like when I was growing up. A water jacket welded onto the back of the wood heater. It went from a 20 gallon drum to the jacket and hot water would return to the drum that had a spigot. It's a good system, as long as you have kids to haul the water and the fire is going.
01-06-2013, 05:34 PM #3
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
when I was younger we had a wood/coal burning arga that heated the whole house. Living off the grid is not particularly difficult other than the medical aspects

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
01-06-2013, 05:40 PM #4
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 05:34 PM)misterbumps Wrote:  when I was younger we had a wood/coal burning arga that heated the whole house. Living off the grid is not particularly difficult other than the medical aspects


Arga? I have never heard of that before, what is it?
01-06-2013, 05:47 PM #5
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,578 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
A sauna stove with a built in water tank is very common around here. It gives you hot water in no time. Most summer cottages has that going on, but usually in a separate sauna building so it won't of course heat up the living quarters.

http://superiorsaunas.com/store/index.ph...&cPath=131
01-06-2013, 05:54 PM #6
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
Quote:The real answer lies in the heat loss of your home. I have heard of some super insulated that can get by with 0ne or two cord and actually need smaller wood stoves so they don't get run out.


Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/firepl...z2HCuc5UeT

What I am thinking is buying about 5-6 acres of woodland, drilling a well, installing a super-insulated prefab smaller home and wood burning stoves, with supplemental solar, wind, and a backup generator.
01-06-2013, 05:56 PM #7
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,578 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Another cheap old trick to keep warm up here:

İmage

These types of metal cones were used (by the ladies) in church to keep warm during church services. Light a candle under the cone and place in on the floor under your skirts. chuckle.gif
01-06-2013, 05:57 PM #8
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 05:56 PM)Octo Wrote:  Another cheap old trick to keep warm up here:

İmage

These types of metal cones were used (by the ladies) in church to keep warm during church services. Light a candle under the cone and place in on the floor under your skirts. chuckle.gif


chuckle.gif

Thanks but I'm toasty hot under there already. ;)
01-06-2013, 05:59 PM #9
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,578 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
chuckle.gif Yeah me too. Besides it doesn't work so well with skinny jeans.
01-06-2013, 06:01 PM #10
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012


wtf2.gif Thanks Joe, I guess.
01-06-2013, 06:06 PM #11
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-06-2013, 05:54 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  What I am thinking is buying about 5-6 acres of woodland, drilling a well, installing a super-insulated prefab smaller home and wood burning stoves, with supplemental solar, wind, and a backup generator.


Nelson Homes (Alberta) would be where I'd start. I bought one in '97 and they're great. Affordable ($47k I paid for a 1100 sq ft package) they come in sections, everything included from floor joists to roofing. They don't include cabinets or flooring. If you do go after this idea make sure the land you buy has a water table, you can always find well drillers to work for cash. Good soil too although that can be trucked in. 20 - 40 acres is a better bet, usually smaller parcels can be more expensive/acre than bigger ones. Could be fun!!
01-06-2013, 06:07 PM #12
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:06 PM)Shadow Wrote:  
(01-06-2013, 05:54 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  What I am thinking is buying about 5-6 acres of woodland, drilling a well, installing a super-insulated prefab smaller home and wood burning stoves, with supplemental solar, wind, and a backup generator.



Nelson Homes (Alberta) would be where I'd start. I bought one in '97 and they're great. Affordable ($47k I paid for a 1100 sq ft package) they come in sections, everything included from floor joists to roofing. They don't include cabinets or flooring. If you do go after this idea make sure the land you buy has a water table, you can always find well drillers to work for cash. Good soil too although that can be trucked in. 20 - 40 acres is a better bet, usually smaller parcels can be more expensive/acre than bigger ones. Could be fun!!


Thank you very much Shadow for the great tips.

01-06-2013, 06:08 PM #13
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
So much to learn about burning wood. wtf2.gif

01-06-2013, 06:09 PM #14
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,578 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-06-2013, 06:01 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  http://youtu.be/qlh-p56eug8

wtf2.gif Thanks Joe, I guess.


I bet he kills mosquitoes with a shotgun too. damned.gif
01-06-2013, 06:12 PM #15
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,268 Threads:1,438 Joined:Feb 2011
Great thread. Found this the other day, if you need to make an emergency SHTF get away, here's a good way to do it and can be ready to sleep in the same day you make it...

http://jungletraining.com/forums/showthr...ters/page4

wonder.gif



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