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Off The Grid Living Tip
01-06-2013, 06:13 PM #16
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,590 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-06-2013, 06:08 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  So much to learn about burning wood. wtf2.gif

http://youtu.be/b1lXgdycUaI


Yes indeed. There's a lot of things you can do to greatly improve the cost of heating using a wood stove. At our cabin we had a regular open fireplace, but we installed this (whatever they're called)

İmage

That makes your fire last up to 3 times longer. It burns slower and produces great heat. hi5.gif
01-06-2013, 06:15 PM #17
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:09 PM)Octo Wrote:  
(01-06-2013, 06:01 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  http://youtu.be/qlh-p56eug8

wtf2.gif Thanks Joe, I guess.


I bet he kills mosquitoes with a shotgun too. damned.gif


chuckle.gif
01-06-2013, 06:23 PM #18
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:06 PM)Shadow Wrote:  
(01-06-2013, 05:54 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  What I am thinking is buying about 5-6 acres of woodland, drilling a well, installing a super-insulated prefab smaller home and wood burning stoves, with supplemental solar, wind, and a backup generator.


Nelson Homes (Alberta) would be where I'd start. I bought one in '97 and they're great. Affordable ($47k I paid for a 1100 sq ft package) they come in sections, everything included from floor joists to roofing. They don't include cabinets or flooring. If you do go after this idea make sure the land you buy has a water table, you can always find well drillers to work for cash. Good soil too although that can be trucked in. 20 - 40 acres is a better bet, usually smaller parcels can be more expensive/acre than bigger ones. Could be fun!!


Now are these superinsulated and do you happen to remember if they offer woodstove ready designs? What I'm looking for are off-the-grid ready prefab homes...solar, wind...etc.
01-06-2013, 06:23 PM #19
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,590 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Here's a bunch of info http://survivalblog.com/

And let's not forget JollyRoger's most excellent thread: http://kritterbox.com/showthread.php?tid=10038
01-06-2013, 06:31 PM #20
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
So, who do I hire before buying the land? A dowser or engineer?

http://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/gw_ruralhomeown...r_new.html

Way too much to learn about water tables. wtf2.gif
01-06-2013, 06:32 PM #21
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(01-06-2013, 05:40 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(01-06-2013, 05:34 PM)misterbumps Wrote:  when I was younger we had a wood/coal burning arga that heated the whole house. Living off the grid is not particularly difficult other than the medical aspects


Arga? I have never heard of that before, what is it?


apologies. I mean't an aga.

The AGA cooker is a heat storage stove and cooker, which works on the principle that a heavy frame made from cast iron components can absorb heat from a relatively low-intensity but continuously-burning source, and the accumulated heat can then be used when needed for cooking. Originally heated by slow-burning coal, the Aga cooker was invented in 1922 by the Nobel Prize-winning Swedish physicist Gustaf Dalén (1869–1937), who was employed first as the chief engineer of the Swedish AGA company (Swedish: Aktiebolaget Svenska Gasaccumolator, English: Joint stock company Swedish Gas Accumulator). The cookers were first imported to Britain in 1929, and were first manufactured there under licence in the early 1930s. The cast iron components were first cast at the Coalbrookdale foundry in the 1940s, where they are still made today by the Aga Rangemaster Group.


We actually had an original one which cost a fortune to buy but saved so much money on heating in the long term.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
01-06-2013, 06:40 PM #22
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-06-2013, 06:23 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  Now are these superinsulated and do you happen to remember if they offer woodstove ready designs? What I'm looking for are off-the-grid ready prefab homes...solar, wind...etc.


When i bought mine I cancelled the insulation Nelson Homes would have sent and insulated it myself. they have 8" walls so yes, you can super insulate, and I blew foam into the ceiling 20" deep. You can always modify to whatever you like with Nelson. For ie, I had a skylight put in the kitchen, a walk out basement and plumbing for an in law suite before the house was put together. They will build the house to your specs based on your choice of floorplan. Adding a wood heater is something that can be done anytime although planning your cabin around your heat source is always the best idea. Oh and build the house over the water well if you can.

That vid too. The darker wood was cut green (the dark color is from mold) and has sat for at least 2 years probably more. The 'lighter' wood was fresh cut and no way to tell if it's green or not, it was just fresh cut when he made the vid. The cracks he talks about are called checks and are the result of dead standing timber not dryness. The darker wood had no checks despite being stacked for (obviously) years. Fir burns dirty and gums your chimney. Pine burns clean and hot but fast, birch is the best, burns clean hot and long, but you can't cut it (in BC at least) poplar burns fast and hot, cedar burns FAST. If you can't get birch get dry pine.

/lecture chuckle.gif
01-06-2013, 06:41 PM #23
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,590 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Quote:the Aga cooker was invented in 1922 by the Nobel Prize-winning Swedish physicist Gustaf Dalén (1869–1937)

I was actually to his grandson's house in Sweden a long time ago. I was working as a nanny for a woman who knew them so I tagged along. Amazing house and very nice people. cheers.gif
01-06-2013, 06:48 PM #24
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
If I was rich I'd have a Tulikivi gaah.gif
01-06-2013, 06:49 PM #25
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:40 PM)Shadow Wrote:  
(01-06-2013, 06:23 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  Now are these superinsulated and do you happen to remember if they offer woodstove ready designs? What I'm looking for are off-the-grid ready prefab homes...solar, wind...etc.


When i bought mine I cancelled the insulation Nelson Homes would have sent and insulated it myself. they have 8" walls so yes, you can super insulate, and I blew foam into the ceiling 20" deep. You can always modify to whatever you like with Nelson. For ie, I had a skylight put in the kitchen, a walk out basement and plumbing for an in law suite before the house was put together. They will build the house to your specs based on your choice of floorplan. Adding a wood heater is something that can be done anytime.

That vid too. The darker wood was cut green (the dark color is from mold) and has sat for at least 2 years probably more. The 'lighter' wood was fresh cut and no way to tell if it's green or not, it was just fresh cut when he made the vid. The cracks he talks about are called checks and are the result of dead standing timber not dryness. The darker wood had no checks despite being stacked for (obviously) years. Fir burns dirty and gums your chimney. Pine burns clean and hot but fast, birch is the best, burns clean hot and long, but you can't cut it (in BC at least) poplar burns fast and hot, cedar burns FAST. If you can't get birch get dry pine.

/lecture chuckle.gif


Not a lecture to me, thanks Shadow. I need to know which type of wood is best for burning and sustainability; Poplar I seem to recall reading - grows the fastest.

http://www.2020site.org/trees/poplar.html


01-06-2013, 06:52 PM #26
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,590 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Birch is absolutely the best firewood. hi5.gif
01-06-2013, 06:54 PM #27
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,881 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:52 PM)Octo Wrote:  Birch is absolutely the best firewood. hi5.gif


When I have time I'll have to research just how fast birch grows, etc. Thanks everyone, gotta go for now.
01-06-2013, 06:55 PM #28
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,590 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
wave.gif Have a great Sunday!
01-06-2013, 06:57 PM #29
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(01-06-2013, 06:41 PM)Octo Wrote:  
Quote:the Aga cooker was invented in 1922 by the Nobel Prize-winning Swedish physicist Gustaf Dalén (1869–1937)

I was actually to his grandson's house in Sweden a long time ago. I was working as a nanny for a woman who knew them so I tagged along. Amazing house and very nice people. cheers.gif


that's almost six degrees of separation stuff!!!

off point, but a few years ago I used to work for a company building mud and stud and straw bale houses. We used to construct these buildings from start to finish with no electrical tools involved. I would hew and adze twenty foot oak trees and we could get a frame up within a couple of weeks. The mud wall proccess was amazing (straw, coal, sand and water added) and even the plaster was made with straw, water, lime and mud. Many of the houses around where I used to live are made like this and stand for many hundreds of years. I was taught how to properly hew a tree so the timber we got was pure heart wood that can even resist a fire. The mud walls were particularly inventive allowing for warmth in winter and coolness in the summer. I know several people who live in these houses, some of which I helped to build and all they have is a single fireplace and the house is kept very toasty. If TSHTF I have my plan to head back to the countryside with my two axes, a saw, a hammer, hand drill and a couple of of other bits of equipment and build a nice retreat deep in some woodland. One of my last houses had bore water and It is actually a fairly straight process to manage. a couple of solar planels and some large batteries and I'm away. Just need a medic to come with me incase I have an accident.....!

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
01-06-2013, 07:01 PM #30
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-06-2013, 06:49 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  Not a lecture to me, thanks Shadow. I need to know which type of wood is best for burning and sustainability; Poplar I seem to recall reading - grows the fastest.


You're welcome hug.gif Poplar does grow fast but you need 5x as much of it to heat your house (all the BTUs fly out the chimney) compared with, say, pine, so any sustainability issue should take that into account.



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