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Question about our perception of time
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:30 AM #1
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?




05-12-2013, 01:36 AM #2
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,718 Threads:1,523 Joined:Feb 2011
Actually, time is tied to gravity so it's not exactly based on earth as a constant. Time is relative.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:41 AM #3
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:36 AM)Octo Wrote:  Actually, time is tied to gravity so it's not exactly based on earth as a constant. Time is relative.


Interesting, just winging it here. I thought it was based off of our rotation, where it takes 24 hours to make one rotation and 365 days to go around the Sun.

If one was to ask my grandpa.."what time is it?" He'd say "half past a monkeys ass and quarter till his balls". But Grandpa is kind of a joker like that. chuckle.gif
05-12-2013, 01:42 AM #4
Accidental Stoner Member
Posts:8,706 Threads:78 Joined:Feb 2011
I've got a couple of friends who swear their natural rhythm
is way slower than the Earth's.

Got one musician/producer pal in particular, who has seemed
to go by 32 hour days since I first met him in 1982.
Hell to work with chuckle.gif


Set my clock by?
Guess I'd count heartbeats, if ever they'd slow down from the
absolute horror I would feel. Then eating/shitting/sleepiness-
patterns etc.

Imagine everything in existence is consciousness.
What is time like for a mountain? A rock? A tree?

But then again:
What is now?
It is not time.

hmm.gif

Cool thread hi5.gif

puffpuffpass.gif


Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:44 AM #5
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
But if it is based off of gravity, take the spacship example where you go out away from our gravity here on Earth and come to a stop. What would you set your clock to?
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:45 AM #6
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:30 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?


No, you just measure time different. If the net speed of someone on it's surface is actually faster or slower then ours the difference would likely be very minimal.


...and one can not truly stop. You would still be orbiting galactic center and the galaxy itself is still moving and the galactic cluster we are apart of is moving and so on... these speeds all add up to make the time flow we are in and I think the differences on other planets would be minimal at best and maybe actually be equivocally balanced when all speeds are considered.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:46 AM #7
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
lol.gif That's funny A.S.

I'm sober right now, you should hear me after smoking a big fatty chuckle.gif
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:49 AM #8
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:45 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:30 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?


No, you just measure time different. If the net speed of someone on it's surface is actually faster or slower then ours the difference would likely be very minimal.


...and one can not truly stop. You would still be orbiting galactic center and the galaxy itself is still moving and the galactic cluster we are apart of is moving and so on... these speeds all add up to make the time flow we are in and I think the differences on other planets would be minimal at best and maybe actually be equivocally balanced when all speeds are considered.


Are you saying that our time is actually based off of the Galaxy? Or that our perception of time is whatever we say it is?
05-12-2013, 01:51 AM #9
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,718 Threads:1,523 Joined:Feb 2011
(05-12-2013, 01:44 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  But if it is based off of gravity, take the spacship example where you go out away from our gravity here on Earth and come to a stop. What would you set your clock to?


I wouldn't set a clock. I haven't been interested in measuring so called time in many many years.

Quote:Gravitational time dilation is at play for ISS astronauts too, and it has the opposite effect of the relative velocity time dilation. To simplify, velocity and gravity each slow down time as they increase. Velocity has increased for the astronauts, slowing down their time, whereas gravity has decreased, speeding up time (the astronauts are experiencing less gravity than on Earth). Nevertheless, the ISS astronaut crew ultimately end up with "slower" time because the two opposing effects are not equally strong. The velocity time dilation (explained above) is making a bigger difference, and slowing down time. The (time-speeding up) effects of low-gravity would not cancel out these (time-slowing down) effects of velocity unless the ISS orbited much farther from Earth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:52 AM #10
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
Ok, you're on another planet, but instead of a 24 hour rotation it has a 48 hour rotation. Would a second on our time become 2 seconds?
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 01:56 AM #11
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
We age over time, right?

So If you're on another planet that has a 48 hour rotation, would we live twice as long?
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:00 AM #12
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:51 AM)Octo Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:44 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  But if it is based off of gravity, take the spacship example where you go out away from our gravity here on Earth and come to a stop. What would you set your clock to?


I wouldn't set a clock. I haven't been interested in measuring so called time in many many years.

Quote:Gravitational time dilation is at play for ISS astronauts too, and it has the opposite effect of the relative velocity time dilation. To simplify, velocity and gravity each slow down time as they increase. Velocity has increased for the astronauts, slowing down their time, whereas gravity has decreased, speeding up time (the astronauts are experiencing less gravity than on Earth). Nevertheless, the ISS astronaut crew ultimately end up with "slower" time because the two opposing effects are not equally strong. The velocity time dilation (explained above) is making a bigger difference, and slowing down time. The (time-speeding up) effects of low-gravity would not cancel out these (time-slowing down) effects of velocity unless the ISS orbited much farther from Earth.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Time_dilation


Alright, but if you did have to set a clock, then what?

Are we missing something with our preception of time? Like should we be going by the Galactic time?

Because our time could not be the same everywhere in the Galaxy.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:02 AM #13
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
Just messing around, killing time. chuckle.gif


05-12-2013, 02:03 AM #14
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,718 Threads:1,523 Joined:Feb 2011
(05-12-2013, 01:56 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  We age over time, right?

So If you're on another planet that has a 48 hour rotation, would we live twice as long?


Not necessarily.

I wouldn't look at the earth time in relation to aging.
05-12-2013, 02:04 AM #15
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,718 Threads:1,523 Joined:Feb 2011
(05-12-2013, 02:02 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  Just messing around, killing time. chuckle.gif


No sweat, interesting topic anyway. beercheer.gif



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