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Question about our perception of time
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:09 AM #16
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:03 AM)Octo Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:56 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  We age over time, right?

So If you're on another planet that has a 48 hour rotation, would we live twice as long?


Not necessarily.

I wouldn't look at the earth time in relation to aging.


Yeah, can understand that, but what if you can't see the Earth?

Seems to me like you would age by the time of the planet you are on, I dunno. But then that leaves questions about time while being in space. Where there is no rotation of a planet to go by.
05-12-2013, 02:16 AM #17
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
If we were in space, would it even matter what time it was on earth? No I don't think so.

What is time anyway at that point. Isn't it all about your own mortality?
05-12-2013, 02:19 AM #18
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
Q: Since time and speed is relative, according to Einstein's theory of relativity, will an atomic clock on the International Space Station be slower than a synchronized atomic clock on the ground? (Yiu Wai Chan)

A: Yes, the clock on the International Space Station (ISS) will tick slower than the earthbound clock because of relativistic effects. However, two effects compete and complicate the picture.

http://usatoday30.usatoday.com/tech/colu...tion_x.htm
05-12-2013, 02:21 AM #19
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
Quote:The dominant effect on the ISS clock is, as you surmised, a slow down because the space station zings around Earth. Einstein figured out, back in 1905, that the speed of light is a constant for all frames of reference. Given that, an observer on Earth peering through a telescope at the ISS clock would see it running slow compared with his own clock. This is the same effect (the "time dilation" effect) that allows a returning space farer twin to be much younger than her earthbound sister, after the astronaut spends years blasting through space at near light speeds.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:26 AM #20
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:49 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:45 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:30 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?


No, you just measure time different. If the net speed of someone on it's surface is actually faster or slower then ours the difference would likely be very minimal.


...and one can not truly stop. You would still be orbiting galactic center and the galaxy itself is still moving and the galactic cluster we are apart of is moving and so on... these speeds all add up to make the time flow we are in and I think the differences on other planets would be minimal at best and maybe actually be equivocally balanced when all speeds are considered.


Are you saying that our time is actually based off of the Galaxy? Or that our perception of time is whatever we say it is?


everything in this galaxy moves with the galaxy and around the galactic center.

net movement = time flow speed

...so the minimal difference of a planet moving around the sun or rotational speed has little effect.

It was discovered awhile back that the galactic model does not operate like a solar system model... the velocity of the outer disc is consistent with that of the inner disc. Meaning that there is no time flow differential coming from our position in the galaxy relative to galactic center ...even though the inner disc experiences more revolutions per cycle then the outer.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:27 AM #21
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:21 AM)Octo Wrote:  
Quote:The dominant effect on the ISS clock is, as you surmised, a slow down because the space station zings around Earth. Einstein figured out, back in 1905, that the speed of light is a constant for all frames of reference. Given that, an observer on Earth peering through a telescope at the ISS clock would see it running slow compared with his own clock. This is the same effect (the "time dilation" effect) that allows a returning space farer twin to be much younger than her earthbound sister, after the astronaut spends years blasting through space at near light speeds.


According to that, time does change away from the planet. The ISS is still under the influence of Earths gravity or it would float way.

That means if you could stop in space and I'm talking about stopping while the Galaxy continues on, time would stop too..right?

05-12-2013, 02:33 AM #22
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
It is a verifiable fact that time (as we measure it) slows down the further away from earth you get.

What the the hell would it matter if time stopped? It's like the metric system seized to exist. So what?
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:35 AM #23
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:26 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:49 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:45 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:30 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?


No, you just measure time different. If the net speed of someone on it's surface is actually faster or slower then ours the difference would likely be very minimal.


...and one can not truly stop. You would still be orbiting galactic center and the galaxy itself is still moving and the galactic cluster we are apart of is moving and so on... these speeds all add up to make the time flow we are in and I think the differences on other planets would be minimal at best and maybe actually be equivocally balanced when all speeds are considered.


Are you saying that our time is actually based off of the Galaxy? Or that our perception of time is whatever we say it is?


everything in this galaxy moves with the galaxy and around the galactic center.

net movement = time flow speed

...so the minimal difference of a planet moving around the sun or rotational speed has little effect.

It was discovered awhile back that the galactic model does not operate like a solar system model... the velocity of the outer disc is consistent with that of the inner disc. Meaning that there is no time flow differential coming from our position in the galaxy relative to galactic center ...even though the inner disc experiences more revolutions per cycle then the outer.


You would think that time would be affected if the center of the galaxy was spinning faster than the outer.

here's a bit of info about galactic time I grabbed from a website: A galactic year can be described as one revolution around the center of the galaxy which at a speed of about 250 km/sec. takes about 226 millions of years with a radius of about 26 thousand lightyears. The age of our solar system is about 20 of these revolutions. Thus we are 20 galactic years old departing from the supposition that our galaxy the Milky Way, is about 4.5 billion years old.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:42 AM #24
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 01:36 AM)Octo Wrote:  Actually, time is tied to gravity so it's not exactly based on earth as a constant. Time is relative.


Time slows down the closer you get to center of gravity ...the heavier the gravity ...the more compressed space becomes ...the closer to zero point.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:44 AM #25
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:33 AM)Octo Wrote:  It is a verifiable fact that time (as we measure it) slows down the further away from earth you get.

What the the hell would it matter if time stopped? It's like the metric system seized to exist. So what?


Just wondering, it's not really important and wanted to ask that question of "what would you set your clock to?"

In Star Trek they use a galactic time? Seems like there would be a universal time that everything and everyone could go by, thinking out loud is all I'm doing.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:48 AM #26
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:35 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 02:26 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:49 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:45 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:30 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  As we all know, our time is based of our planet, its rotation and the yearly journey around the Sun.

Now imagine you were on a different planet, with a faster/slower rotation on its axis and a faster/slower trip around the Sun, what we call a year. Wouldn't time on that planet be different than ours? I think so.

Ok, now imagine you had a spaceship that could carry you off this planet and you came to a complete stop out in space. What would you set your clock by?


No, you just measure time different. If the net speed of someone on it's surface is actually faster or slower then ours the difference would likely be very minimal.


...and one can not truly stop. You would still be orbiting galactic center and the galaxy itself is still moving and the galactic cluster we are apart of is moving and so on... these speeds all add up to make the time flow we are in and I think the differences on other planets would be minimal at best and maybe actually be equivocally balanced when all speeds are considered.


Are you saying that our time is actually based off of the Galaxy? Or that our perception of time is whatever we say it is?


everything in this galaxy moves with the galaxy and around the galactic center.

net movement = time flow speed

...so the minimal difference of a planet moving around the sun or rotational speed has little effect.

It was discovered awhile back that the galactic model does not operate like a solar system model... the velocity of the outer disc is consistent with that of the inner disc. Meaning that there is no time flow differential coming from our position in the galaxy relative to galactic center ...even though the inner disc experiences more revolutions per cycle then the outer.


You would think that time would be affected if the center of the galaxy was spinning faster than the outer.

here's a bit of info about galactic time I grabbed from a website: A galactic year can be described as one revolution around the center of the galaxy which at a speed of about 250 km/sec. takes about 226 millions of years with a radius of about 26 thousand lightyears. The age of our solar system is about 20 of these revolutions. Thus we are 20 galactic years old departing from the supposition that our galaxy the Milky Way, is about 4.5 billion years old.


...but it isn't. It travels at the same velocity as the outer.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galaxy_rotation_curve

Don't confuse measuring references with the speed of time.
05-12-2013, 02:51 AM #27
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
Actually I used to set all my clocks at least 5 minutes ahead of "time" to make sure everybody was out of there in "time". Sure it's a damned good idea to keep time if you have earthly meetings, school and work and such, but that's only applicable to this planet.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 02:52 AM #28
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
(05-12-2013, 02:42 AM)Anonymous Kritter Wrote:  
(05-12-2013, 01:36 AM)Octo Wrote:  Actually, time is tied to gravity so it's not exactly based on earth as a constant. Time is relative.


Time slows down the closer you get to center of gravity ...the heavier the gravity ...the more compressed space becomes ...the closer to zero point.


The faster one moves the heavier you become the slower time moves from your perception.

It's not so much a matter of leaving the earth but the increase in your speed.

So many different ways of looking at it and understanding it from different angles.

it all ties in space... time... matter... velocity.
05-12-2013, 02:56 AM #29
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:40,961 Threads:1,544 Joined:Feb 2011
Yes it all ties in. The fact that they haven't figured this one out yet makes me think it's a really simple and beautiful solution. You just can't even begin to touch the unification theory without involving love I strongly believe. And how do you even translate that into a formula.
Anonymous Kritter Show this Post
05-12-2013, 03:02 AM #30
Anonymous Kritter Incognito Anonymous
 
Remember the Superman movie where whats her face got killed, so Superman went around the Earth real fast and reversed the rotation and turned back time, then he could save her?

So...that's really possible then?


Because if time can be slowed with extreme gravity, like in a Black Hole.Time may be able to stop.


My brain is starting to get overloaded now, gonn ahve to take a break. chuckle.gif





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