#Login Register


  • 22 Vote(s) - 3.18 Average
Home 


Saudi Arabia drafts in up to 10,000 troops ahead of protests
03-05-2011, 10:21 AM #1
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,177 Threads:1,437 Joined:Feb 2011
Desperate to avoid mass uprisings against the House of Saud, security forces have deployed in huge numbers across the region.

King Abdullah is also reported to have told neighbouring Bahrain that if they do not put down their own ongoing Shia revolt, his own forces will.
In response to the massive mobilisation, protesters are planning to place women on the front ranks to discourage Saudi forces from firing on them.

Read more: telegraph.co.uk

Saudi Arabia sells their oil in usd and its one of the only things that gives the dollar any tangible value since Nixon took the US off the gold standard in the 1970's. If that changes, we could see the USD bottom out quite rapidly. damned.gif

wonder.gif
03-05-2011, 04:09 PM #2
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,794 Threads:1,183 Joined:Feb 2011
I don't think we'll see $100/bbl oil again. And that'll be disastrous. I remember in '08 when it went to $147/bbl, 3 major trucking co.s in the US shut down. Arrow cancelled all their fuel cards without warning and left their drivers and rigs stranded all over the country. Closing on 8 billion pop. and land water and food are getting scarce never mind the energy to produce and transport goods. I was in the grocery store yesterday, looking around in the produce section. Bananas and canteloupes, fresh strawberries, dragon fruit, kiwis, all these incredible fruits and vegetables from all around the globe. If there is a severe energy crunch all those poor farmers that grow and sell this produce, well they won't have a market for them.

Look what happened to the Baltic Dry Index when oil went so high in '08. Shipping collapsed.

İmage


İmage

03-05-2011, 05:13 PM #3
Tacolover II Member
Posts:427 Threads:59 Joined:Feb 2011
03-05-2011, 07:00 PM #4
Upāsaka Member
Posts:1,383 Threads:252 Joined:Feb 2011
Home / Saudi Arabia / Demonstrations banned in Kingdom: Interior Ministry
Demonstrations banned in Kingdom: Interior Ministry

JEDDAH: The Interior Ministry issued a statement on Saturday warning against public demonstrations.

“Laws and regulations in the Kingdom prohibit all kinds of demonstrations, marches and sit-in protests, as well as calling for them, as they go against the principles of Shariah and Saudi customs and traditions,” the ministry said in its statement.

ArabNews

Earlier in the week

Report: Saudi Facebook activist planning protest shot dead

Riyadh/Cairo - Saudi activists alleged Wednesday that state security shot dead a leading online activist, who was calling for a 'Day of Rage' on March 11 in the oil-rich kingdom.

Faisal Ahmed Abdul-Ahadwas, 27, was believed to be one of the main administrators of a Facebook group that is calling for protests similar to that have swept North Africa and the Middle East.

The Facebook group, which has over 17,000 members, is calling for nationwide protests and reforms, including that governors and members of the upper house of parliament be elected, the release of political prisoners, greater employment, and greater freedoms.

Online activists said they believe Abdul-Ahadwas was killed by state security and that his body was taken by authorities to 'hide evidence of the crime.'

http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/m...-shot-dead

The Saudi's are not going to pump more oil anytime soon. Late last year they just signed the biggest arms deal in world history with the US, amounting to over $60 billions. They have to recycle the petrodollars somehow and pay for the weapons.
03-05-2011, 07:28 PM #5
Tacolover II Member
Posts:427 Threads:59 Joined:Feb 2011
(03-05-2011, 07:00 PM)Prometheus Wrote:  Home / Saudi Arabia / Demonstrations banned in Kingdom: Interior Ministry
Demonstrations banned in Kingdom: Interior Ministry

JEDDAH: The Interior Ministry issued a statement on Saturday warning against public demonstrations.

“Laws and regulations in the Kingdom prohibit all kinds of demonstrations, marches and sit-in protests, as well as calling for them, as they go against the principles of Shariah and Saudi customs and traditions,” the ministry said in its statement.

ArabNews

Earlier in the week

Report: Saudi Facebook activist planning protest shot dead

Riyadh/Cairo - Saudi activists alleged Wednesday that state security shot dead a leading online activist, who was calling for a 'Day of Rage' on March 11 in the oil-rich kingdom.

Faisal Ahmed Abdul-Ahadwas, 27, was believed to be one of the main administrators of a Facebook group that is calling for protests similar to that have swept North Africa and the Middle East.

The Facebook group, which has over 17,000 members, is calling for nationwide protests and reforms, including that governors and members of the upper house of parliament be elected, the release of political prisoners, greater employment, and greater freedoms.

Online activists said they believe Abdul-Ahadwas was killed by state security and that his body was taken by authorities to 'hide evidence of the crime.'

http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/m...-shot-dead

The Saudi's are not going to pump more oil anytime soon. Late last year they just signed the biggest arms deal in world history with the US, amounting to over $60 billions. They have to recycle the petrodollars somehow and pay for the weapons.

http://www.financialpost.com/news/Saudi+...story.html

"Top exporter Saudi Arabia has raised oil output above nine-million barrels per day (bpd) to make up for a near halt in Libyan exports"
03-05-2011, 07:40 PM #6
Tacolover II Member
Posts:427 Threads:59 Joined:Feb 2011
This is considered a informal raise in production as was not voted on from other OPEC Nations. But they did do it. Saudi crude is heavier in comparison to Libyan Lighter Sweeter crude. Replacement of Lilyan crude is harder to replace but depending on refining can be made into higher product such as fuel. Just takes more crude and more expensive.

That is why Brent Crude price has increased so quickly. Everybody will be ok, just pay more...again...

When longer term contracts are found price should decrease.
03-05-2011, 08:14 PM #7
Upāsaka Member
Posts:1,383 Threads:252 Joined:Feb 2011
http://www.peterdalescott.net/opec.html

Quote:From Drugs, Oil, and War by Peter Dale Scott, Chapter Two, 41-42, 53-54:

The US dependency on international oil and petrodollars has been accelerated, in the context of globalization and war.

At the height of the Vietnam War, with inflation threatening to wreck his domestic program for a "great society," Lyndon Johnson relaxed the import quota system that had been introduced by Eisenhower to protect domestic US oil production. <19> This increased US vulnerability to the pressure of OPEC oil boycotts in the 1970s, and that vulnerability would be further heightened after Nixon abolished quotas altogether in 1973.

The US handled the quadrupling of oil prices in the 1970s by arranging, by means of secret agreements with the Saudis, for the recycling of petrodollars back into the US economy. The first of these deals assured a special and on-going Saudi stake in the health of the US dollar; the second secured continuing Saudi support for the pricing of all OPEC oil in dollars. <20> These two deals assured that the US economy would not be impoverished by OPEC oil price hikes. The heaviest burdens would be borne instead by the economies of less developed countries. <21>

From these developments emerged the twin phenomena, underlying 9/11, of triumphalist US unilateralism on the one hand, and global third-world indebtedness on the other. The secret deals increased US-Saudi interdependence at the expense of the international comity which had been the base for US prosperity since World War II. They also increased Saudi leverage on U.S. foreign policy, as was seen in the 1979 sale of F-15 fighter planes to Saudi Arabia, against strong Israeli opposition. <22> In particular they explain why George Bush moved so swiftly in 1990 to counter the threat posed by Saddam Hussein to U.S.-Saudi security in the Persian Gulf. The threat was not just that the US itself would lose oil from the Gulf, against which the U.S. was partially insured by the redundancy in world oil supplies. A bigger threat was that Saddam would become the dominant power in the Persian Gulf, directly controlling 20 percent of OPEC production and 25 percent of world oil reserves. <23>

The US-Saudi deals also increased the dependence of the US on oil- and drug-funded Arab assets such as BCCI, the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, which in the 1980s became a chief paymaster for the anti-Soviet Afghan mujahedin, and even ran arms directly to them from Karachi. <24> (The failure of the US Government to investigate and prosecute BCCI reflected not only the extent of BCCI penetration of US ruling circles, but also the dependency of the US economy on the continued influx of petrodollars and narcodollars. As a former NSC economist commented, "[Treasury Secretary James] Baker didn't pursue BCCI because he thought a prosecution of the bank would damage the United States' reputation as a safe haven for flight capital and overseas investments." <25>

Some had expected that the successful OPEC revolt in the 1970s against Washington's and London's economic policies would presage a "new economic order" that would strengthen the South vis-à-vis the North. The secret Saudi-US deals led to a different outcome: a "new world order" that saw increasing US military dominance combined with increasing economic instability and occasional crises elsewhere. Statistics reveal the change in direction. Between 1960 and 1980 per capita income grew 73 percent in Latin America and 34 percent in Africa. Between 1980 and 2000 income grew less than 6 percent in Latin America, and declined by 23 percent in Africa. <26>

This loss of economic stability and momentum, combined with political impotence in the face of US military hegemony, are of course root factors to be addressed in any serious effort to combat terrorism.

FOOTNOTES

<19> Yergin, The Prize, 538-39.

<20> David E. Spiro, The Hidden Hand of American Hegemony: Petrodollar Recycling and International Markets (Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1999), x: "In 1974 [Treasury Secretary William] Simon negotiated a secret deal so the Saudi central bank could buy U.S. Treasury securities outside of the normal auction. A few years later, Treasury Secretary Michael Blumenthal cut a secret deal with the Saudis so that OPEC would continue to price oil in dollars. These deals were secret because the United States had promised other industrialized democracies that it would not pursue such unilateral policies." Cf. 103-12.

<21> "So long as OPEC oil was priced in U.S. dollars, and so long as OPEC invested the dollars in U.S. government instruments, the U.S. government enjoyed a double loan. The first part of the loan was for oil. The government could print dollars to pay for oil, and the American economy did not have to produce goods and services in exchange for the oil until OPEC used the dollars for goods and services. Obviously, the strategy could not work if dollars were not a means of exchange for oil. The second part of the loan was from all other economies that had to pay dollars for oil but could not print currency. Those economies had to trade their goods and services for dollars in order to pay OPEC" (Spiro, Hidden Hand, 121).

<23> See also below. John Loftus and Mark Aarons (The Secret War Against the Jews (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1994), 343), who do not mention the two secret financial deals with the Saudis, offer a different and I think one-sided account of the sale of the F-15s; cf. Spiro, Hidden Hand, 123-24.

<23> Yergin, The Prize, 772.

<24> Cooley, Unholy Wars, 116-17.

<25> Jonathan Beaty and S.C. Gwynne, The Outlaw Bank: A Wild Ride into the Heart of BCCI (New York: Random House, 1993), 357.

<26> Greg Palast, The Best Democracy Money Can Buy (London: Pluto Press, 2002), 48. Palast supplies examples of how the IMF, created at Bretton Woods in 1944 to promote economic stabilization and growth, has since 1980 promoted the opposite by policies that contract economies to preserve debt payments. Cf. Nobel-winning economist Joseph Stiglitz, formerly of the World Bank, on the IMF response to the Asian crisis of 1997: "It went to the countries and told them to be more contractionary than they wanted, to increase interest rates enormously. It was just the opposite of the economic analysis that was the basis of the founding of the IMF. Why? In order to make sure that creditors got repaid" (Joseph Stiglitz [Interview with Lucy Komisar], Progressive [June 2000]: 34).

This system is what both the Saudis and the US Gov, what to see continue.

The people of Saudi Arabia, are seeing what others are doing around the region and they want some of it too.
03-05-2011, 08:27 PM #8
Tacolover II Member
Posts:427 Threads:59 Joined:Feb 2011
Not all Saudi Arabians, quality of life would diminish greatly. Life is different in Saudi Arabia than in Libya and Egypt.
03-05-2011, 10:45 PM #9
Upāsaka Member
Posts:1,383 Threads:252 Joined:Feb 2011
Good to see Saint Taco ignoring the facts on the ground and the history of Saudi Arabia and completely ignoring my post.

Sure the house of Saud doesn't want it to change and is so worried that the king comes out with a $36 billion package for the" people for change."They've heard it before, Saudi Arabia is a very repressive regime.

They carry out public be-heading's and lashing people for minor criminal offenses,.

Your Tacit support for the status quo, should come as no surprise.

So here's a Lesson for you, in facts, which I'm sure you'll ignore. Just like the last post.

http://internationalbusiness.wikia.com/w...stribution

Quote: * There is an estimated population of 20,850 million people that live in the borders of Saudi Arabia, about 5,000 hold over 400 billion dollars of the countries currency.

United States and other countries around the world have a common misconception that Saudi Arabia has an unlimited amount of money, due to their petroleum exports.
* In Saudi Arabia the upper class is the government, and they have set up a monarchy referred to as the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. This gives them the power to dictate how much each family receives.
* Petroleum accounts for 90% of Saudi Arabia's exports, making it the largest exporter in the whole world. It also accounts for up to 75% of the Kingdom's profits. The government tries to support its people but there is a large population that does not receive benefits from its countries profitability.
* The Kingdom now holds about 20 million citizens that qualify as lower middle class to extreme poverty.
* The truth about Saudi Arabia is that about 40% of the countries GDP goes straight to the few extremely fortunate.

Poverty Due to Government Education Edit Poverty Due to Government Education

One of the main problems facing the Kingdom today is the lack of good education. Saudi government is ran strictly through religion, there are little to no exceptions when it comes down to sacred law. State run schools in Saudi Arabia are ran with an extremest Wahabism mentality. This form of education keeps the government's "monopoly on violence" strong. God is used to create order, obedience, and fear throughout the country. When money is not being distributed equally throughout the country, and only a small group receives more than what they can spend, no one says anything. The government uses the education system to keep the country from uprising and also allowing the royal families to keep taking more without any hardship.

* Wahabism is a sect of Islam that preaches extreme loyalty to whatever ruler no matter how corrupt.

Poverty and Women Edit Poverty and Women

Freedom in the Kingdom is not something that is equal for all. Women in Saudi Arabia are treated like peaces of property, and are completely dominated by whatever man owns them. Since women do not receive the same rights, they also cannot expand their own knowledge and education. This lack of education keeps women in line, "Not a single entry in the Holy Quran denies a woman her rights. Not a single entry denies a woman her basic freedoms." The government and men in general throughout the middle east see women as inferior, but what they can not see is that women bring a lot to the economy. The slavery that these women go through on a daily basis restricts them from creating or bringing anything to the kingdom.

* There is about a 2% literacy rate for women throughout the Kingdom.
* Women are not seen fit to run a business or go to work do to the conservative outlook of their culture
* Due to foreigners taking up to 7 million jobs, women are starting to gain more leverage in the workforce.

Income and Wealth Distribution Edit Income and Wealth Distribution sectionEdit

"This King is revered, honored, and his word is final. A ‘commoner’s’ life is dependent on the King or his sons for not just wealth distribution, but for his fate, and often his very life." This quote explains how the life of a everyday citizen in the Kingdom lives. Saudi Arabia since ancient times has distributed its wealth through royal families. This is the largest problem with the country today because the oil companies are owned by these families. Common people are dependent on the generosity and mercy of the King and his princes within their area.

* "The King in this case, is not the Crowned Prince of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, but a member of the ruling royals, and in tribal terms, is deemed the King –the one who oversees the activities and interrelations of the people who ‘belong’ to him."

Yeah, there are differences between Egypt and Saudi Arabia, One was allowed to have an uprising of the people, started/ powered by the youth using Facebook as one component. In S.Arabia, the person who started a facebook was murdered and his body taken away.

Libya is run by ego crackpot dictator(although hopefully for not much longer) who carried out terrorist attacks against the west and his own citizens.

But when he decided to play nice and let Big Oil come and drill in his back yard (biggest oil reserves in African) They forgive the murdering son of a bitch, for more 'Black Gold'.

All three authoritarian states had similarities as well. They were/are backed by Big Oil.

In each case the people have lost their fear of Government, you can't put that genie back in the bottle. Unless The Government severely oppress/attack their own citizens. Which each state has/does still do.

But I'm not going to discuss geopolitics, with you Taco.


03-06-2011, 01:38 AM #10
Tacolover II Member
Posts:427 Threads:59 Joined:Feb 2011
Wow, I was purely stating facts as I know them with supporting links. Your statement was Saudi Arabia has not increased oil exports which I disagreed with and provided supporting links.

Dude I am just focusing on credible information. Seems you have some type of hostilities towards my supported viewpoints.

For that I just share no animosities and when your worthless claims are proven incorrect you whine like a spoiled brat. So have it your way but hope 1-day you will mature in to a credible human being. Realizing you have a very long way to go, good luck on your journeys

Tacolover

bleh.gif



Home 




 



DISCLAIMER / Terms of Service (TOS):
Kritterbox.com - Socialize anonymously, commentary, discussion, oddities, technology, music and more!  This website is provided "as is" without warranty of any kind, either expressed or implied. kritterbox.com shall not be liable for any damages whatsoever, including, without limitation, those resulting from loss of use, data or profits, whether or not advised of the possibility of damage, and on any theory of liability, arising out of or in connection with the use or performance of this site or other documents which are referenced by or linked to this site.
This website exists solely for the purposes of exchange of information, communication and general entertainment. Opinions from posters are in no way endorsed by kritterbox.com. All posts on this website are the opinion of the authors and are not to be taken as statements of fact on behalf of kritterbox.com. This site may contain coarse language or other material that kritterbox.com is in no way responsible for. Material deemed to be offensive or pornographic at the discretion of kritterbox.com shall be removed. kritterbox.com reserves the right to modify, or remove posts and user accounts on this website at our discretion. kritterbox.com disclaims all liability for damages incurred directly or indirectly as a result of any material on this website. Fictitious posts and any similarity to any person living or dead is coincidental.
All users shall limit the insertion of any and all copyrighted material to portions of the article that are relevant to the point being made, with no more than 50%, and preferably less of the original source material. A link shall be visible in text format, embedded directly to the original source material without exception.
No third party links, i.e. blogs or forums will be accepted under any circumstances, and will be edited by staff in order to reflect the original source of copyrighted material, or be removed at the sole discretion of kritterbox.com.
Fair Use Notice:
This site may contain copyrighted material the use of which has not always been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. Users may make such material available in an effort to advance awareness and understanding of issues relating to economics, individual rights, international affairs, liberty, science, and technology. This constitutes a 'fair use' of any such copyrighted material as provided for in section 107 of the US Copyright Law. In accordance with Title 17 U.S.C.Section 107, the material on this site is distributed without profit to those who have expressed a prior interest in receiving the included information for educational and/or research purposes.
This Disclaimer is subject to change at any time at our discretion.
Copyright © 2011 - 2017 kritterbox.com