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So much for internet privacy
07-30-2011, 10:15 PM #1
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:11,165 Threads:770 Joined:Feb 2011
Researchers Expose Cunning Online Tracking Service That Can’t Be Dodged


"So if a user came to Hulu.com from an ad on Facebook, and then later, using a different browser on the same computer, visited Hulu.com from Google, and then at some point signed up for the premium service, KISSmetrics would be able to tell Hulu all about that user’s path to purchase (without knowing who that person was). That tracking trail would remain in place even if a user deleted her cookies, due to code that stores the unique ID in places other than in a traditional cookie."

“The stuff works even if you have all cookies blocked and private-browsing mode enabled,” Soltani said. “The code itself is pretty damning.”

"The researchers were reprising a study from 2009 which discovered that some of the net’s biggest sites were using technology from online ad tracking firms Clearspring and Quantcast to re-create users’ cookies after users deleted them. The technique involved using a little known property of Flash to hold onto unique ID numbers. Then, if a user deleted her cookies, the companies would check in the secondary stash for the user ID, and use it to resurrect the traditional HTML cookies."



In other words, they are installing software on our computers without our permission.

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What politics from both sides wants to teach us is that things are never complex. If you have your little package and something doesn't fit into that package, You don't know what to make of it so you want to dismiss it or then you will have to do the work of reconsidering your assumptions. - Michael Malice
07-30-2011, 10:29 PM #2
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:30,268 Threads:1,493 Joined:Feb 2011
tracking cookies yup. They are everywhere. We DO NOT and will NEVER do that because, well.... honestly we don't want to know, or give a shit about where anybody has been. chuckle.gif we refuse to have ads so we don't have to pander to any form of censorship.
There is a clear division happening on the net, those who conform and visit the same sites as their parents, and sites like ours.
It's all up to the individual I suppose.

wonder.gif

07-30-2011, 10:37 PM #3
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:11,165 Threads:770 Joined:Feb 2011
Tracking cookies are bad enough but at least they can be blocked or removed. Regardless what they want to call it, their software is malware and should be illegal. Clicking on their site does not give them the right to install something on my computer that I can not even remove. If that is their intention, they should be required to have a warning as their intro page.



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What politics from both sides wants to teach us is that things are never complex. If you have your little package and something doesn't fit into that package, You don't know what to make of it so you want to dismiss it or then you will have to do the work of reconsidering your assumptions. - Michael Malice
07-30-2011, 10:49 PM #4
Upāsaka Member
Posts:1,127 Threads:252 Joined:Feb 2011
[Image: 12032258125571.jpg]

chuckle.gif
07-30-2011, 10:54 PM #5
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:30,268 Threads:1,493 Joined:Feb 2011
lol.gif I think everybody knows they are safe here at least, it's hard to data mine people when most of us are on a first name basis. It's like spamming your friends real mail box or worse. 37.gif

You're right Kreeper, it should be a software EULA agreement before visiting the BBC, CNN, even some unscrupulous forum owners will try to do it, I've seen it. I've yet to understand the reasons for doing it though. dunno.gif

wonder.gif

07-30-2011, 11:43 PM #6
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:11,165 Threads:770 Joined:Feb 2011
They do it because of all that pay per click nonsense. It helps them know where to put ads and how much to pay. At least that's what I think. Otherwise I would be forced to see it as testing of tracking software for future control of the masses.

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What politics from both sides wants to teach us is that things are never complex. If you have your little package and something doesn't fit into that package, You don't know what to make of it so you want to dismiss it or then you will have to do the work of reconsidering your assumptions. - Michael Malice
07-31-2011, 12:45 PM #7
Ghostie Member
Posts:953 Threads:212 Joined:Mar 2011
lso's people need to learn/ avoid these

get better privacy add on for fire fox and you'll be able to delete them also install flash block add oncheers.gif
07-31-2011, 02:27 PM #8
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:30,268 Threads:1,493 Joined:Feb 2011
A biggie for privacy macromedia.com

Everyone should open this up and adjust the settings, or fuck flash altogether and uninstall.
BY DEFAULT it allows websites to track you, and even if you delete flash cookies they can recreate themselves through your registry.
If you are on a laptop w/ built in mic/camera I'm talking to you, unless one uses this settings manager to adjust your privacy settings; websites can see and hear what you are doing via your mic/camera.
That's right let me say it one more time.....
Unless one uses this settings manager to adjust your privacy settings; websites can see and hear what you are doing via your mic/camera. damned.gif
Or you can get around the whole thing by write protecting your adobe flash directory. If anybody is slightly interested just google it.
It's everyone's duty to protect themselves from unscrupulous websites. I need not drop names, it's widespread.
Carry on.

wonder.gif




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