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Surviving the Carboniferous period
07-28-2015, 08:33 AM #1
Drew Incognito Anonymous
 
My sister asked me if Humans could have survived in the carboniferous period, could we have breathed, could we have survived the wildlife, could we have flourished...

I said yes, we could have.
For one thing the wildlife were the dumbest and lowest creatures on earth.
It was the age of bugs, giant bugs.

It would not have been a very comfortable time to be around, because the prey consists of bugs.
You want to eat giant bugs ? LOL !

And yes we could have survived the wildlife...
It would have been very easy to kill... all we would have to do is give it a decent kick in order to crush them... they're bugs.. they have exoskeletons.

:P
07-28-2015, 07:07 PM #2
Accidental Stoner Member
Posts:8,924 Threads:71 Joined:Feb 2011
Good protein.

İmage
07-28-2015, 07:43 PM #3
US nli Incognito Anonymous
 
There wereprimitive people that ate bugs and used them for medicine, such as with the Australian aborigines.

Quote:Cooked witchety grubs frequently have been likened in taste to almonds. The larvae are rich in calories, protein, and fat. Ten large grubs are sufficient to provide the daily needs of an adult.

Quote:Although the Aboriginal diet was generally low in sugar, honeypot ants were a highly valued food that provided a source of sugar for the Aborigines of central Australia. Workers of the honeypot ant (Melophorus bagoti Lubbock and Campanoyus spp.) gather honeydew from scale insects and psyllids, and feed it to other workers, which become mere nectar storage vessel with greatly enlarged abdomens.

Quote:Bogong moth Noctuidae Adult moth used as food.

Bush cockroach Blattidae Local anesthetic.

Green tree ant Formicidae Used to prepare a refreshing drink, cure headaches, and as a cold remedy, as an antiseptic and expectorant.

Honeypot ant Formicidae Worker ants used as food.

Lerp insect Psyllidae Lerp (manna-like substance) was sugar source used directly as food and also made into drinks.

Processionary caterpillar Notodontidae Silk bag made by gregarious larvae used as a protective dressing for wounds.

Sugarbag honey bees Apidae Hive (sugarbag) of native bees consumed for food and honey used as medicine to “clean their guts out”

Termites Termitidae Didjeridu (wind instrument) made from tree limbs hollowed out by termites and termites used as food and termitaria used for absorbent antidiarrheal agent.

Witchety grub Cossidae Fat-rich larvae used as food and crushed to provide a protective covering for wounds and burns.

When I took a survival course, the first thing we were told to look for were grubs under rotting branches.
07-28-2015, 07:46 PM #4
Accidental Stoner Member
Posts:8,924 Threads:71 Joined:Feb 2011
Still today popular street food in Indochina.

İmage
07-28-2015, 08:13 PM #5
Nomadic wanderer. Member
Posts:59 Threads:7 Joined:Jul 2015
You can find a wide variety of fried bugs in South-East Asian night markets.

Though I never had the guts (pun intended) to try any, I have had friends eat crickets only to say they tasted disgusting!! bleh.gif
07-28-2015, 08:43 PM #6
US nli Incognito Anonymous
 
(07-28-2015, 08:13 PM)Nomadic wanderer. Wrote:  You can find a wide variety of fried bugs in South-East Asian night markets.

Though I never had the guts (pun intended) to try any, I have had friends eat crickets only to say they tasted disgusting!! bleh.gif

Due to insects having exoskeletons and probably parasites, one needs to learn how to prepare them before cooking/eating.
Preparation of crickets for any recipe:

It is important to note that crickets should only be purchased from reliable sources. Crickets should be treated much in the same manner as any other raw food, in particular seafood. In other words it is best to keep crickets fresh as possible.

Prior to preparing your crickets for a meal place them inside a plastic container or storage bag and keep them in the refrigerator at least for an hour or until you are ready to use them. This will not kill the crickets, but rather slow down their metabolism, inducing a state of hypothermia, in other words, prohibiting their movement when removed from container. If you prefer however, as many people do, feel free to place them inside the freezer for an hour or two as this will definitely kill them, guaranteeing their immobility.

After removing from refrigerator or freezer, place them in a pot of boiling water sized to hold the specific amount of crickets you’re using. Add a few pinches of salt. Boil for about two minutes. This ensures cleanliness. Once boiled, remove from water and let cool. Crickets at this time can be placed in storage bags and kept in the freezer or used right away for any number of recipes. All crickets should be prepared in this manner prior to eating.
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07-28-2015, 09:13 PM #7
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,973 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
You'd be pretty much ƒükkêd up here if you'd have to rely on insects for food
JayRodney nli Show this Post
07-28-2015, 09:34 PM #8
JayRodney nli Incognito Anonymous
 
yup.gif How many filthy ass tics, deer flys and mosquitos can one consume ffsi 13.gif
07-28-2015, 09:49 PM #9
US nli Incognito Anonymous
 
Hey Octo, the answer to bug scarcity in Finland might be to start insect farms. This is supposedly the future of farming protein for humans and farm animals.

"They say waxworms taste just like chicken skin".

http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/05/...e_eat.html
07-28-2015, 09:53 PM #10
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,973 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
Maybe 5000 mosquitoes for a burger patty whew.gif
07-28-2015, 09:58 PM #11
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,973 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
(07-28-2015, 09:49 PM)US nli Wrote:  Hey Octo, the answer to bug scarcity in Finland might be to start insect farms. This is supposedly the future of farming protein for humans and farm animals.

"They say waxworms taste just like chicken skin".

http://www.thestar.com/business/2014/05/...e_eat.html

But why? There's so many other great options to eating insects. Hemp for instance which also improve the topsoil and can be used for thousands of other things.

Quote:Hemp seeds are notable as a high-protein food source, providing 73% of the Daily Value (DV) in a 100 g serving.[7] Hempseed amino acid profile is comparable to other sources of protein such as meat, milk, eggs and soy.[8] Protein Digestibility Corrected Amino Acid Score values (PDCAAS), which measure the degree to which a food for humans is a "complete protein", were 0.49-0.53 for whole hemp seed, 0.46-0.51 for hemp seed meal, and 0.63-0.66 for dehulled hemp seed.[9]

Hemp seeds are also a rich source of the dietary minerals, magnesium (160% DV), zinc (77% DV) and iron (53% DV), and a good source of dietary fiber (13% DV).[7]

Approximately 73% of the energy in hemp seeds is in the form of fats and essential fatty acids,[7] mainly polyunsaturated fatty acids, linoleic, oleic and alpha-linolenic acids.[8]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp#Nutrition
07-28-2015, 09:59 PM #12
US nli Incognito Anonymous
 
I think the reasoning is less land and food resources are required to farm insects.



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