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THE CIA AND THE MEDIA
07-27-2014, 07:58 PM #1
stickmonkey Member
Posts:48 Threads:22 Joined:May 2014
İmage
The history of the CIA’s involvement with the American press continues to be shrouded by an official policy of obfuscation and deception for the following principal reasons:

■ The use of journalists has been among the most productive means of intelligence‑gathering employed by the CIA. Although the Agency has cut back sharply on the use of reporters since 1973 primarily as a result of pressure from the media), some journalist‑operatives are still posted abroad.

■ Further investigation into the matter, CIA officials say, would inevitably reveal a series of embarrassing relationships in the 1950s and 1960s with some of the most powerful organizations and individuals in American journalism.

Among the executives who lent their cooperation to the Agency were Williarn Paley of the Columbia Broadcasting System, Henry Luce of Tirne Inc., Arthur Hays Sulzberger of the New York Times, Barry Bingham Sr. of the LouisviIle Courier‑Journal, and James Copley of the Copley News Service. Other organizations which cooperated with the CIA include the American Broadcasting Company, the National Broadcasting Company, the Associated Press, United Press International, Reuters, Hearst Newspapers, Scripps‑Howard, Newsweek magazine, the Mutual Broadcasting System, the Miami Herald and the old Saturday Evening Post and New York Herald‑Tribune.

By far the most valuable of these associations, according to CIA officials, have been with the New York Times, CBS and Time Inc.

The CIA’s use of the American news media has been much more extensive than Agency officials have acknowledged publicly or in closed sessions with members of Congress. The general outlines of what happened are indisputable; the specifics are harder to come by. CIA sources hint that a particular journalist was trafficking all over Eastern Europe for the Agency; the journalist says no, he just had lunch with the station chief. CIA sources say flatly that a well‑known ABC correspondent worked for the Agency through 1973; they refuse to identify him. A high‑level CIA official with a prodigious memory says that the New York Times provided cover for about ten CIA operatives between 1950 and 1966; he does not know who they were, or who in the newspaper’s management made the arrangements.

The Agency’s special relationships with the so‑called “majors” in publishing and broadcasting enabled the CIA to post some of its most valuable operatives abroad without exposure for more than two decades. In most instances, Agency files show, officials at the highest levels of the CIA usually director or deputy director) dealt personally with a single designated individual in the top management of the cooperating news organization. The aid furnished often took two forms: providing jobs and credentials “journalistic cover” in Agency parlance) for CIA operatives about to be posted in foreign capitals; and lending the Agency the undercover services of reporters already on staff, including some of the best‑known correspondents in the business.

In the field, journalists were used to help recruit and handle foreigners as agents; to acquire and evaluate information, and to plant false information with officials of foreign governments. Many signed secrecy agreements, pledging never to divulge anything about their dealings with the Agency; some signed employment contracts., some were assigned case officers and treated with. unusual deference. Others had less structured relationships with the Agency, even though they performed similar tasks: they were briefed by CIA personnel before trips abroad, debriefed afterward, and used as intermediaries with foreign agents. Appropriately, the CIA uses the term “reporting” to describe much of what cooperating journalists did for the Agency. “We would ask them, ‘Will you do us a favor?’”.said a senior CIA official. “‘We understand you’re going to be in Yugoslavia. Have they paved all the streets? Where did you see planes? Were there any signs of military presence? How many Soviets did you see? If you happen to meet a Soviet, get his name and spell it right .... Can you set up a meeting for is? Or relay a message?’” Many CIA officials regarded these helpful journalists as operatives; the journalists tended to see themselves as trusted friends of the Agency who performed occasional favors—usually without pay—in the national interest.

“I’m proud they asked me and proud to have done it,” said Joseph Alsop who, like his late brother, columnist Stewart Alsop, undertook clandestine tasks for the Agency. “The notion that a newspaperman doesn’t have a duty to his country is perfect balls.”

From the Agency’s perspective, there is nothing untoward in such relationships, and any ethical questions are a matter for the journalistic profession to resolve, not the intelligence community. As Stuart Loory, former Los Angeles Times correspondent, has written in the Columbia Journalism Review: ‘If even one American overseas carrying a press card is a paid informer for the CIA, then all Americans with those credentials are suspect .... If the crisis of confidence faced by the news business—along with the government—is to be overcome, journalists must be willing to focus on themselves the same spotlight they so relentlessly train on others!’ But as Loory also noted: “When it was reported... that newsmen themselves were on the payroll of the CIA, the story caused a brief stir, and then was dropped.”

During the 1976 investigation of the CIA by the Senate Intelligence Committee, chaired by Senator Frank Church, the dimensions of the Agency’s involvement with the press became apparent to several members of the panel, as well as to two or three investigators on the staff. But top officials of the CIA, including former directors William Colby and George Bush, persuaded the committee to restrict its inquiry into the matter and to deliberately misrepresent the actual scope of the activities in its final report. The multivolurne report contains nine pages in which the use of journalists is discussed in deliberately vague and sometimes misleading terms. It makes no mention of the actual number of journalists who undertook covert tasks for the CIA. Nor does it adequately describe the role played by newspaper and broadcast executives in cooperating with the Agency.

THE AGENCY’S DEALINGS WITH THE PRESS BEGAN during the earliest stages of the Cold War. Allen Dulles, who became director of the CIA in 1953, sought to establish a recruiting‑and‑cover capability within America’s most prestigious journalistic institutions. By operating under the guise of accredited news correspondents, Dulles believed, CIA operatives abroad would be accorded a degree of access and freedom of movement unobtainable under almost any other type of cover.
http://www.carlbernstein.com/magazine_cia_and_media.php
07-27-2014, 08:03 PM #2
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,775 Threads:1,181 Joined:Feb 2011
The deception and thought control of the msm goes well beyond rationale. It's frustrating.
07-27-2014, 08:34 PM #3
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,379 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
I read this interesting tidbit today:

Quote:CIA's activity in Finland rose to the headlines this week when professor of political history, Kimmo Rentola, claimed that Johannes Virolainen and Max Jakobson were CIA resources.

http://postimg.org/image/6ncunsv6r/

Max Jakobson has been attending Bilderberg meetings several times... coffeetime.gif
07-27-2014, 09:09 PM #4
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,775 Threads:1,181 Joined:Feb 2011
Finland is in strategic proximity to Russia. So it doesn't surprise me.
07-27-2014, 09:13 PM #5
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,379 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
It's established that the CIA helped funding the Finnish social democratic party

Quote:The CIA began to support the Finnish Social Democrats in 1949. The aid from the CIA was used for field work against the Communists.
At the same time, the Soviet Union gave financial aid to the Finnish Communist Party. The monetary aid from Moscow also was turned into markka through intermediaries.

http://www.hs.fi/english/print/1135230733413
07-27-2014, 09:15 PM #6
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,379 Threads:1,483 Joined:Feb 2011
And seriously guys, if they do this in Finland... What are they doing at home?

13.gif
07-27-2014, 09:18 PM #7
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,590 Threads:1,443 Joined:Feb 2011
They are still very much embedded in the press. They act like something has changed?

wonder.gif
07-27-2014, 09:35 PM #8
stickmonkey Member
Posts:48 Threads:22 Joined:May 2014
07-27-2014, 10:02 PM #9
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,590 Threads:1,443 Joined:Feb 2011
clap.gif Excellent video. I see that type of thing... steering as it were, go on in the co dependency group think places.

wonder.gif



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