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The 'Bugout' Thread.
11-14-2014, 02:47 AM #241
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
(11-14-2014, 02:39 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:25 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:21 AM)Shadow Wrote:  rofl.gif
Damn I hope you have warm gear, the Highlands in Nov is not where I'd be thrilled to be living in a tent damned.gif

Yes I have plenty of warm gear and no I won't be living in a tent. I built a wooden shack during my initial stay and have a good supply of firewood.

All the best with it NoDoom. It was a shame we didn't get a chance to meet for coffee whilst you were back in the city but hopefully next time we can. I've just been snowed under with uni and work at present.

Good luck with everything in Scotland. Maybe when I get some time off next summer I can come up to visit.

I hope all went well with the other thing and you can now move onwards.

Oh if there is plenty of mud where your bug out is then I suggest a mud and stud structure. They are amazing.

All the best.

All went OK but difficult with that thing and I have one last day tomorrow to finish it. There will always be a warm welcome to you if you should chose to visit.

Interesting you mention about mud as I have covered the roof with it.

Life is like a penny, you can spend it on what you like, but you can ONLY spend it once.


https://twitter.com/NigelLondon2014

11-14-2014, 02:51 AM #242
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
(11-14-2014, 02:44 AM)Shadow Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:25 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  Yes I have plenty of warm gear and no I won't be living in a tent. I built a wooden shack during my initial stay and have a good supply of firewood.

What do you burn your wood in? It's fairly easy to make a stove from a 45 gallon drum.

I have built a fireplace with local granite and stone and a makeshift chimney. Outside I have a small oven for bread and roasting game etc.. I cook and boil water in the fireplace.

Life is like a penny, you can spend it on what you like, but you can ONLY spend it once.


https://twitter.com/NigelLondon2014

11-14-2014, 04:41 PM #243
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(11-14-2014, 02:47 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:39 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:25 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:21 AM)Shadow Wrote:  rofl.gif
Damn I hope you have warm gear, the Highlands in Nov is not where I'd be thrilled to be living in a tent damned.gif

Yes I have plenty of warm gear and no I won't be living in a tent. I built a wooden shack during my initial stay and have a good supply of firewood.

All the best with it NoDoom. It was a shame we didn't get a chance to meet for coffee whilst you were back in the city but hopefully next time we can. I've just been snowed under with uni and work at present.

Good luck with everything in Scotland. Maybe when I get some time off next summer I can come up to visit.

I hope all went well with the other thing and you can now move onwards.

Oh if there is plenty of mud where your bug out is then I suggest a mud and stud structure. They are amazing.

All the best.

All went OK but difficult with that thing and I have one last day tomorrow to finish it. There will always be a warm welcome to you if you should chose to visit.

Interesting you mention about mud as I have covered the roof with it.

I hope that other thing gets resolved and you can find some peace now. I know how difficult these situations can be as something similar happened to me.

On the house building topic I once worked for two years with a guy (a friend of the family) who builds and restores mud and stud houses for a living. It was a real privilege to work with him and he taught me a great deal from hewing and adzing twenty foot tree trunks, making oak frames, laying pad stones, building brick foundations and mud and studding walls and ceilings. It was an amazing experience and one he does with limited newer technological involvement. (He uses a chainsaw to cut down the oak trees) He builds twenty foot A-frames that he fixes pulleys and ropes to in order to lift the heavy stuff.) Joints are cut using saws and chisels. I used two types of axes to hew and red chalk to mark the point of cutting. Hewing means that most of the sap wood is removed leaving the heart of the oak which is strong enough to resist fire. Saw mills are quick (It takes me a whole day to hew a twenty foot oak tree) but saw mills leave as much sap wood as heart wood which over time becomes weak. Holes are drilled with hand drills and he uses wood plugs instead of nails. Mudding is hard work as you have to mix charcoal, stripped down straw, water and mud into one substance and a decent sized house requires a lot of this mix plus a special type of long fork is needed to build the walls and ceiling with pressure to ensure the bonding process takes . Lime is excellent for plastering although it takes two to three days to dry so a spell of good weather is needed. These types of buildings insulate well in winter and are cool enough during the summer months. My least favourite part of the job was stripping the straw into smaller pieces. One good thing is that if T.SH.T.F I can build a comfortable home with no need for electrical input during the build. Obviously solar panels would be required thereafter as well as a generator for a borehole for water (Although I have read an article about a guy who made his own borehole saving £2000 pounds in the process). I would use wooden pan tiles for a roof. The main problem with such builds is that they take at least eight months to construct. A reasonable cottage would require twenty to thirty oak trees which would take a month to hew never mind the joint cutting and wood splitting.
As you have, I have also travelled quite a bit and I have seen these structures all over the world from Africa to India. Also straw-bail houses are good alternatives but even though electric wiring can be properly insulated through copper or plastic piping I still wouldn't be comfortable knowing straw is flammable.

Check out the net as there are so many beautiful mud and stud houses and all the people (not many now) who work within this dying industry have great advice and smart ideas. I was lucky enough to work for two years building and restoring mud and stud houses with a guy who is nationally respected and classed as a master-builder.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
11-14-2014, 04:55 PM #244
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(11-14-2014, 04:41 PM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:47 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:39 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:25 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:21 AM)Shadow Wrote:  rofl.gif
Damn I hope you have warm gear, the Highlands in Nov is not where I'd be thrilled to be living in a tent damned.gif

Yes I have plenty of warm gear and no I won't be living in a tent. I built a wooden shack during my initial stay and have a good supply of firewood.

All the best with it NoDoom. It was a shame we didn't get a chance to meet for coffee whilst you were back in the city but hopefully next time we can. I've just been snowed under with uni and work at present.

Good luck with everything in Scotland. Maybe when I get some time off next summer I can come up to visit.

I hope all went well with the other thing and you can now move onwards.

Oh if there is plenty of mud where your bug out is then I suggest a mud and stud structure. They are amazing.

All the best.

All went OK but difficult with that thing and I have one last day tomorrow to finish it. There will always be a warm welcome to you if you should chose to visit.

Interesting you mention about mud as I have covered the roof with it.

I hope that other thing gets resolved and you can find some peace now. I know how difficult these situations can be as something similar happened to me.

On the house building topic I once worked for a year with a guy (a friend of the family) who builds and restores mud and stud houses for a living. It was a real privilege to work with him and he taught me a great deal from hewing and adzing twenty foot tree trunks, making oak frames, laying pad stones, building brick foundations and mud and studding walls and ceilings. It was an amazing experience and one he does with limited newer technological involvement. (He uses a chainsaw to cut down the oak trees) He builds twenty foot A-frames that he fixes pulleys and ropes to in order to lift the heavy stuff.) Joints are cut using saws and chisels. I used two types of axes to hew and red chalk to mark the point of cutting. Hewing means that most of the sap wood is removed leaving the heart of the oak which is strong enough to resist fire. Saw mills are quick (It takes me a whole day to hew a twenty foot oak tree) but saw mills leave as much sap wood as heart wood which over time becomes weak. Holes are drilled with hand drills and he uses wood plugs instead of nails. Mudding is hard work as you have to mix charcoal, stripped down straw, water and mud into one substance and a decent sized house requires a lot of this mix plus a special type of long fork is needed to build the walls and ceiling with pressure to ensure the bonding process takes . Lime is excellent for plastering although it takes two to three days to dry so a spell of good weather is needed. These types of buildings insulate well in winter and are cool enough during the summer months. My least favourite part of the job was stripping the straw into smaller pieces. One good thing is that if T.SH.T.F I can build a comfortable home with no need for electrical input during the build. Obviously solar panels would be required thereafter as well as a generator for a borehole for water (Although I have read an article about a guy who made his own borehole saving £2000 pounds in the process). I would use wooden pan tiles for a roof. The main problem with such builds is that they take at least eight months to construct. A reasonable cottage would require twenty to thirty oak trees which would take a month to hew never mind the joint cutting and wood splitting.
As you have, I have also travelled quite a bit and I have seen these structures all over the world from Africa to India. Also straw-bail houses are good alternatives but even though electric wiring can be properly insulated through copper or plastic piping I still wouldn't be comfortable knowing straw is flammable.

Check out the net as there are so many beautiful mud and stud houses and all the people (not many now) who work within this dying industry have great advice and smart ideas. I was lucky enough to work for a year building and restoring mud and stud houses with a guy who is nationally respected and classed as a master-builder.

Also it is considered good luck to plant a coin in the mud generally at the bottom of the structure and near a pad stone. We used to put a pound coin in each build.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
11-14-2014, 05:18 PM #245
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,612 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
You have some valuable skills misterbumps cheers.gif

edit: and so does Nodoom obviously. Excellent thread!
11-14-2014, 06:21 PM #246
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(11-14-2014, 05:18 PM)Octo Wrote:  You have some valuable skills misterbumps cheers.gif

edit: and so does Nodoom obviously. Excellent thread!

Thank you. The experience was amazing and I was very lucky. An interesting side note - When we worked on these builds thatchers would work with us on some roofs and I watched them marvelling at the process. It is one of those skills I'd love to learn. My old boss said to me 'if something interests you, research it and then go ahead and do it. You will make many mistakes but you will learn from them all'

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
11-14-2014, 06:47 PM #247
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(11-14-2014, 02:44 AM)Shadow Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 02:25 AM)NODOOM Wrote:  Yes I have plenty of warm gear and no I won't be living in a tent. I built a wooden shack during my initial stay and have a good supply of firewood.

What do you burn your wood in? It's fairly easy to make a stove from a 45 gallon drum.

I read where those gallon drums are too thin to take the heat and don't last long, can you can recommend a good youtube video? Maybe there are thicker drums that can take the heat for long periods, or perhaps you mean the stove design is efficient and the fuel doesn't have to burn as hot! ???
11-16-2014, 06:00 AM #248
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(11-14-2014, 06:47 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I read where those gallon drums are too thin to take the heat and don't last long, can you can recommend a good youtube video? Maybe there are thicker drums that can take the heat for long periods, or perhaps you mean the stove design is efficient and the fuel doesn't have to burn as hot! ???

Well yeah, they aren't really intended for long term use, just a cheap, quick or little used alternative to a permanent stove. But I'm sure Nodoom and misterbumps know much more about that sort of thing.
11-16-2014, 06:38 AM #249
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(11-16-2014, 06:00 AM)Shadow Wrote:  
(11-14-2014, 06:47 PM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I read where those gallon drums are too thin to take the heat and don't last long, can you can recommend a good youtube video? Maybe there are thicker drums that can take the heat for long periods, or perhaps you mean the stove design is efficient and the fuel doesn't have to burn as hot! ???

Well yeah, they aren't really intended for long term use, just a cheap, quick or little used alternative to a permanent stove. But I'm sure Nodoom and misterbumps know much more about that sort of thing.

If TSHTF would it not be for long term use?
11-16-2014, 04:32 PM #250
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
(11-16-2014, 06:38 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  If TSHTF would it not be for long term use?

If the SHTF I'd hardly refuse one because it won't last terribly long.
11-16-2014, 09:16 PM #251
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
When I was younger we lived in a farmhouse and had a Aga cooker that ran on oil. We used it to heat the rest of the home and I will always remember our cat who used to curl up and sleep on the lesser heated of the hob covers. Oil Aga's are dying out now and the biggest sellers are electrical Aga's with some of them now featuring the ability to use a smart phone to control the oven and hob settings. Truly amazing stuff.

My favourite place in our farm house was the conservatory in which we had a Villager wood burner. It was so warm and toasty and I spent many hours lying on the couch with my feet up in front of the burner reading books.

I just briefly looked up wood burning stoves on Google and they are still pretty pricey. The cheapest I could find was £150 but I think perhaps a second hand one may be around the fifty pound mark. Besides when houses get renovated things like wood burners often get scrapped but I'm not sure this happens so much now because everything has a value and everyone knows it. (think copper pipes and church roof lead) Having said that living in London you wouldn't believe the things people chuck away. I constantly scour the streets for items that have been thrown out for trash. So far I have found a old pine bookshelf, a small clothes cupboard and a nice corner unit.

A cheap wood burner

Wood Stove for £60

Also I found a website called http://www.preloved.co.uk

I guess you could build a brick/clay based wood burner that you can fit a wide based metal extraction top a few inches above it and have it fixed to a flue that could then be fixed to and through the roof.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
11-17-2014, 06:17 PM #252
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(11-16-2014, 04:32 PM)Shadow Wrote:  
(11-16-2014, 06:38 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  If TSHTF would it not be for long term use?

If the SHTF I'd hardly refuse one because it won't last terribly long.

I would not refuse one either if one was to be had. What if none were to be had? I would then need to know how to build a wilderness fireplace/stove out of rock and mud(?), I guess. So, far I've watched a few youtube vids and can't find a good rock/brick/mud fireplace/stove (combined), because if TSHTF and we are forced into the wildnerness, that's the materials I will have to work with. Summer (mud, sticks, rocks)...Winter (sticks and rocks). Anyone have any good rock fireplace/firepit/stove ideas?
11-20-2014, 02:03 PM #253
The Survivor Truthtard
Posts:5,013 Threads:522 Joined:Sep 2012
I am back at "The bugout" yay.gif

Everything is as I left it and the sat link is working.

Gonna have to see about some more chickens in the next few days.

A ton of work needs doing on the veg plot but I will enjoy that. I have plenty of wood so I shall be warm.

Cloudy day with chance for rain later. Not too cold though.

More later.

Life is like a penny, you can spend it on what you like, but you can ONLY spend it once.


https://twitter.com/NigelLondon2014

11-20-2014, 02:31 PM #254
Accidental Stoner Member
Posts:8,819 Threads:70 Joined:Feb 2011
hi5.gif

Damn that sounds nice.

puffpuffpass.gif

Gardening season well well over over here.

Life downtown grey and tight like a friggin fishtank...
Haven't seen sky nor sun in a week now 13.gif
Well below zero, but no snow...just...greyness.

But what the hell...I&I be smiling anyway doobie.gif
11-20-2014, 03:03 PM #255
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,612 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
Glad to hear you made it back yay.gif

Yeah it's been awfully dreary here, but that's how it usually plays out here this time of year gaah.gif



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