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The six Emotional Arcs of Storytelling
07-09-2016, 07:57 PM #16
Coolchick Member
Posts:5,205 Threads:118 Joined:Mar 2013
here is a story for you


http://panique.com.au/trishansoz/waltzin...waltz.html

i have had this song in my head all day today lol
i dont know why.

Just Plain Nuts.
07-10-2016, 02:10 PM #17
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(07-09-2016, 07:39 PM)Coolchick Wrote:  isnt margaret atwood a little.. depressing?

lol

never really got into her stuff much.

i like original writing as well.
i think the best way to write a good story is simply to tell about something
you are passionate about.

then it just comes naturally as opposed to 'making up' a story.

Yes, now that you mention it, she does write depressingly - which obviously is a money-making book-selling approach too (misery loves company?). But her latest works don't seem like her, probably more like her writer husband (maybe he helped more than he should have?) :dunno
07-10-2016, 02:15 PM #18
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(07-09-2016, 07:57 PM)Coolchick Wrote:  here is a story for you


http://panique.com.au/trishansoz/waltzin...waltz.html

i have had this song in my head all day today lol
i dont know why.

Thanks, quite an interesting historical account. Here's the song that inspired Waltzing Matilda.

http://panique.com.au/trishansoz/waltzin...ielea.html
07-10-2016, 02:31 PM #19
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(07-09-2016, 02:05 PM)Octo Wrote:  Data Mining Reveals the Six Basic Emotional Arcs of Storytelling

Scientists at the Computational Story Laboratory have analyzed novels to identify the building blocks of all stories.

<snip>
The results make for interesting reading. Reagan and co say that their techniques all point to the existence of six basic emotional arcs that form the building blocks of more complex stories. They are also able to identify the stories that are the best examples of each arc.

The six basic emotional arcs are these:

A steady, ongoing rise in emotional valence, as in a rags-to-riches story such as Alice’s Adventures Underground by Lewis Carroll. A steady ongoing fall in emotional valence, as in a tragedy such as Romeo and Juliet. A fall then a rise, such as the man-in-a-hole story, discussed by Vonnegut. A rise then a fall, such as the Greek myth of Icarus. Rise-fall-rise, such as Cinderella. Fall-rise-fall, such as Oedipus.

Finally, the team looks at the correlation between the emotional arc and the number of story downloads to see which types of arc are most popular. It turns out the most popular are stories that follow the Icarus and Oedipus arcs and stories that follow more complex arcs that use the basic building blocks in sequence. In particular, the team says the most popular are stories involving two sequential man-in-hole arcs and a Cinderella arc followed by a tragedy.

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/60184...rytelling/

spock.gif

So, generally, are people (unhappy/depressed readers) seeking to connect their misery with others' misery via storytelling? Perhaps to not feel isolated and as if something is wrong with them for being depressed (stigma)?
07-10-2016, 03:36 PM #20
Kanigo2 Member
Posts:85 Threads:3 Joined:Mar 2013
I view it as a form of mental "tinnitus"
Like a constant emotional whistle that plays out under the conscious awareness of many people.

In effect, these authors "tapped into" a basic human "tone? Note? Chord?"


"-it struck a chord"



Many people measure the world,love,their very self worth, by their pain.
07-10-2016, 04:24 PM #21
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
Copywriting selling tips. So, #5 People think in terms of people, this one may prod me into taking that college night course in character development.

http://www.copyblogger.com/psychological-selling/
07-10-2016, 05:27 PM #22
Coolchick Member
Posts:5,205 Threads:118 Joined:Mar 2013
(07-10-2016, 03:36 PM)Kanigo2 Wrote:  I view it as a form of mental "tinnitus"
Like a constant emotional whistle that plays out under the conscious awareness of many people.

In effect, these authors "tapped into" a basic human "tone? Note? Chord?"


"-it struck a chord"



Many people measure the world,love,their very self worth, by their pain.

like, perhaps, richard kadrey..?

;)

Just Plain Nuts.
07-10-2016, 06:21 PM #23
K-2 Incognito Anonymous
 
Oh Ill go even further with the Idea:)

It is my understand that people in general "self reinforce" their own "(pain)ful stories" as a method to hold onto their self-identity(ego death).

if that rubicon is crossed they crack and become disassociated--into an even ending CYCLE of visions, stories, intuitions that reinforce the original pain.



in effect people will cater to the pain that makes them feel "whole" in its concious state(awake) by talking to others of their pain and finding stories that reflect the self identity they are trying to maintain internally.


it goes beyond "catering to your own predudices" and is a wonderful part of the human condition.


old adages that fit-
"consuming content that caters to your own prejudice"
and
"Know thyself.."

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
.

sadly, CC, I see this MIT study as no more than a welcome to the new** computer generated feeling simulator*now with emotionally linked programming.


its a SELF REINFORCING mental prison
07-10-2016, 07:07 PM #24
Coolchick Member
Posts:5,205 Threads:118 Joined:Mar 2013
'sadly, CC, I see this MIT study as no more than a welcome to the new** computer generated feeling simulator*now with emotionally linked programming.'


i am not sure how this has anything to do with richard kadrey. 13.gif
lol. but ok then!

Just Plain Nuts.
07-11-2016, 02:12 PM #25
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
Yet, not everyone is governed by their emotions, some use critical/analytical thinking and others a mixture of both.

I have always found mystery novels a big draw (Sherlock, "Come Watson, come. The game is afoot.").

http://ebookfriendly.com/most-popular-bo...fographic/
07-11-2016, 06:04 PM #26
Coolchick Member
Posts:5,205 Threads:118 Joined:Mar 2013
i like the urban fantasy genre.

its pretty much all i read.

Just Plain Nuts.



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