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12-10-2014, 12:37 AM #46
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:25 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I don't dismiss seeking psychiatric help entirely, as I believe it can help some people some of the time, along with proper medication. My brother chose to leave this world, even when his mental issues were controlled and he was not self-medicating with drugs - while in a closed ward. There was something else wrong there, something unaddressed, undiagnosed...but I don't blame his psychiatric team, nor doctors, nor any of us that desperately tried to help him. It seemed that he just didn't want to remain here. So, perhaps there is so much more to helping someone other than fixing a hurt child (psychologically-speaking), perhaps our society makes life so difficult and intolerable for some people that they can see no light at the end of the tunnel, because for many there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
12-10-2014, 12:45 AM #47
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:37 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:25 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I don't dismiss seeking psychiatric help entirely, as I believe it can help some people some of the time, along with proper medication. My brother chose to leave this world, even when his mental issues were controlled and he was not self-medicating with drugs - while in a closed ward. There was something else wrong there, something unaddressed, undiagnosed...but I don't blame his psychiatric team, nor doctors, nor any of us that desperately tried to help him. It seemed that he just didn't want to remain here. So, perhaps there is so much more to helping someone other than fixing a hurt child (psychologically-speaking), perhaps our society makes life so difficult and intolerable for some people that they can see no light at the end of the tunnel, because for many there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.
12-10-2014, 12:50 AM #48
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:45 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:37 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:25 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I don't dismiss seeking psychiatric help entirely, as I believe it can help some people some of the time, along with proper medication. My brother chose to leave this world, even when his mental issues were controlled and he was not self-medicating with drugs - while in a closed ward. There was something else wrong there, something unaddressed, undiagnosed...but I don't blame his psychiatric team, nor doctors, nor any of us that desperately tried to help him. It seemed that he just didn't want to remain here. So, perhaps there is so much more to helping someone other than fixing a hurt child (psychologically-speaking), perhaps our society makes life so difficult and intolerable for some people that they can see no light at the end of the tunnel, because for many there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.

Advocates play an important role. I hope you're well-being is not affected by what is considerable pressure and I mean that sincerely

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
12-10-2014, 12:56 AM #49
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:50 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:45 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:37 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:25 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I don't dismiss seeking psychiatric help entirely, as I believe it can help some people some of the time, along with proper medication. My brother chose to leave this world, even when his mental issues were controlled and he was not self-medicating with drugs - while in a closed ward. There was something else wrong there, something unaddressed, undiagnosed...but I don't blame his psychiatric team, nor doctors, nor any of us that desperately tried to help him. It seemed that he just didn't want to remain here. So, perhaps there is so much more to helping someone other than fixing a hurt child (psychologically-speaking), perhaps our society makes life so difficult and intolerable for some people that they can see no light at the end of the tunnel, because for many there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.

Advocates play an important role. I hope you're well-being is not affected by what is considerable pressure and I mean that sincerely

Thanks, but I am also looked after quite well by many people in my life, who don't hesitate to tell me what they think I should do, or how to live my life. Especially my mother, who continues to ask me where do I get such strange notions about travelling upon my retirement and not staying home watching TV. You see, she thinks my future plans are not doable, therefore she must try to bring me down to her reality, which does not include any form of travel at all. To me, it all boils down to personal perception and feeling defeated.
12-10-2014, 12:58 AM #50
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:56 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:50 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:45 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:37 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:25 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  I don't dismiss seeking psychiatric help entirely, as I believe it can help some people some of the time, along with proper medication. My brother chose to leave this world, even when his mental issues were controlled and he was not self-medicating with drugs - while in a closed ward. There was something else wrong there, something unaddressed, undiagnosed...but I don't blame his psychiatric team, nor doctors, nor any of us that desperately tried to help him. It seemed that he just didn't want to remain here. So, perhaps there is so much more to helping someone other than fixing a hurt child (psychologically-speaking), perhaps our society makes life so difficult and intolerable for some people that they can see no light at the end of the tunnel, because for many there is no light at the end of the tunnel.

Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.

Advocates play an important role. I hope you're well-being is not affected by what is considerable pressure and I mean that sincerely

Thanks, but I am also looked after quite well by many people in my life, who don't hesitate to tell me what they think I should do, or how to live my life. Especially my mother, who continues to ask me where do I get such strange notions about travelling upon my retirement and not staying home watching TV. You see, she thinks my future plans are not doable, therefore she must try to bring me down to her reality, which does not include any form of travel at all. To me, it all boils down to personal perception and feeling defeated.

My mum retired last year and she has been travelling to all sorts of places. It makes me happy to know she is enjoying retirement and being active.

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
12-10-2014, 01:03 AM #51
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
(12-10-2014, 12:58 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:56 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:50 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:45 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:37 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  Again I'm sorry about your brother. My father was the exact opposite. He was an alcoholic who refused to accept addiction as a mental illness and did nothing to recover. In the end he took his own life and nothing anyone said or did helped. He was a stubborn man. I agree with you on many points. Life is not a utopia and there are categories of people who simply don't fit in. These people often get labelled as mentally unwell. I just try and do my job as best I can and hope that sometime in the future mental illness is taken extremely seriously and more studies and better medicine can turn the tide. I just can't deal with the pressure of feeling that the job I do is not good enough. I am glad we had this mini debate as it is important to me in my role to not only understand the mentally ill but those that are willing to help in a civilian capacity.

At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.

Advocates play an important role. I hope you're well-being is not affected by what is considerable pressure and I mean that sincerely

Thanks, but I am also looked after quite well by many people in my life, who don't hesitate to tell me what they think I should do, or how to live my life. Especially my mother, who continues to ask me where do I get such strange notions about travelling upon my retirement and not staying home watching TV. You see, she thinks my future plans are not doable, therefore she must try to bring me down to her reality, which does not include any form of travel at all. To me, it all boils down to personal perception and feeling defeated.

My mum retired last year and she has been travelling to all sorts of places. It makes me happy to know she is enjoying retirement and being active.

Yes, that is the goal, being active, visiting new and exciting places and enjoying retirement, not sitting watching TV. Just to add a thought, I am not a lone advocate for everyone. I am one of many in social circles who all try to help each other, which gives me hope. I also think that a person deciding to want to end their life may not always have mental illness issues associated with their decision, as there are many other sociological factors that may play a role in that decision.
12-10-2014, 01:19 AM #52
misterbumps Member
Posts:1,051 Threads:38 Joined:Apr 2012
(12-10-2014, 01:03 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:58 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:56 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:50 AM)misterbumps Wrote:  
(12-10-2014, 12:45 AM)UniqueStranger Wrote:  At this point, the one woman has been through the counsellor/psychologist gambit with and without her husband. Her recent episode was strictly due to trying a new medication...with disastrous results. She is now back on the old drug, which is not perfect but helps.

The other woman slips in and out of depression and begins on the path of isolation, which I and others don't let her get too comfortable in. I have my ways of rooting her out of that isolation and make sure other people in her life do the same. We will not let her go so easily.

I too am sorry for the loss of your father, and I am sorry if I offended you in your profession, but I have seen and heard from others the failings of many facets of the medical profession including psychology, particularly in dealing with people who abuse drugs. That is why I will always go with my husband to the hospital for his procedures to ensure he has an advocate there to speak up for him when he can not. Little will they know I studied medical terminology.

Advocates play an important role. I hope you're well-being is not affected by what is considerable pressure and I mean that sincerely

Thanks, but I am also looked after quite well by many people in my life, who don't hesitate to tell me what they think I should do, or how to live my life. Especially my mother, who continues to ask me where do I get such strange notions about travelling upon my retirement and not staying home watching TV. You see, she thinks my future plans are not doable, therefore she must try to bring me down to her reality, which does not include any form of travel at all. To me, it all boils down to personal perception and feeling defeated.

My mum retired last year and she has been travelling to all sorts of places. It makes me happy to know she is enjoying retirement and being active.

Yes, that is the goal, being active, visiting new and exciting places and enjoying retirement, not sitting watching TV. Just to add a thought, I am not a lone advocate for everyone. I am one of many in social circles who all try to help each other, which gives me hope. I also think that a person deciding to want to end their life may not always have mental illness issues associated with their decision, as there are many other sociological factors that may play a role in that decision.

I concur

I can see by your coat my friend you're from the other side. Just one thing I got to know. Who won?
12-10-2014, 05:31 AM #53
Wicked Oblivion Member
Posts:10,778 Threads:720 Joined:Oct 2012
12-10-2014, 05:34 AM #54
Wicked Oblivion Member
Posts:10,778 Threads:720 Joined:Oct 2012
12-10-2014, 04:08 PM #55
Wicked Oblivion Member
Posts:10,778 Threads:720 Joined:Oct 2012
Quote: "Without music life would be a mistake" - Friedrich Nietzsche

12-10-2014, 04:12 PM #56
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,612 Threads:1,469 Joined:Feb 2011
This was interesting... hmm.gif

Laughing gas 'can lift depression': Inhaling nitrous oxide found to lift mood of patients where all over treatments had failed

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-...ailed.html
12-10-2014, 04:17 PM #57
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
Laughter is the best medicine yup.gif
12-10-2014, 04:24 PM #58
Wicked Oblivion Member
Posts:10,778 Threads:720 Joined:Oct 2012
Unfortunately if anyone really wants to kill themselves theres actually nothing that anyone else can say or do that will stop them from doing it...
12-10-2014, 04:24 PM #59
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:14,898 Threads:420 Joined:Jun 2012
I agree that laughter is the best medicine, and that's why I come to KB. hug.gif

India decriminalized attempted suicide.

Quote:People who attempt suicide and survive will no longer be treated as criminals, with the government removing Section 309 of the Penal Code from the statute book, junior Home Minister Haribhai Parathibhai Chaudhary told Parliament.

Suicides have been on the rise in India, where thousands of farmers who are unable to pay back loans end their lives every year. The loans -- from banks and loan sharks -- are often used by farmers to buy seed and farm equipment, or to pay large dowries to get their daughters married. But a bad harvest can put a farmer deeply in debt.


Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/india-to-dec...z3LV6ieES1

Quote:Soli Sorabjee, a top Indian lawyer, welcomed the government's decision, saying that a suicide attempt is a manifestation of a person's condition of mind, deserving of treatment and not punishment.

Read more: http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/india-to-dec...z3LV7VOdm3

As for the farmers, the treatment would be financial help, but is the government listening or offering financial help....NO!
12-10-2014, 04:28 PM #60
Shadow Mrs. Buckwheat
Posts:12,782 Threads:1,182 Joined:Feb 2011
When I see 'India' and 'suicide' I think 'Monsanto'.



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