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Toxic Cats
12-10-2012, 03:52 AM #1
DiggerDawg Member
Posts:401 Threads:34 Joined:Sep 2012
UP TO HALF OF ALL HUMANS ARE INFECTED BY A CAT-BORNE PARASITE THAT CAN CAUSE STILLBIRTH, BRAIN DAMAGE, AND A HOST OF OTHER SUBTLE NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS. IS VACCINATION THE SOLUTION?

İmage

Credit: Flickr user kevindooley
Toxoplasmosis is a serious disease when transmitted from a pregnant mother to the unborn fetus, potentially resulting in stillbirth, brain damage, or long-term eye damage that can lead to blindness. Even worse, it’s extremely common in a most common animal, the house cat—and it’s easily transmissible from cats to humans. The parasite that causes it, Toxoplasma gondii, is found in one-third to one-half of all humans—over two billion individuals! This potential killer likes to take up residence inside your brain.

So why don’t we hear more about toxoplasmosis? There are a couple reasons. First, it’s a relatively benign disease for most people, comparable to a moderate flu. Second, it’s much less common in its most dangerous form, when transmitted from a pregnant woman to the fetus. This is because it’s only likely to be transmitted if the mother was recently infected herself. Still, it’s estimated that the disease costs as much as eight billion dollars a year in the US; it affects over 1 in 15,000 childbirths in the US and as many as 1 in 500 in parts of the world where the disease is more common.

British science writer Ed Yong gives a good introduction to T. gondii in this post: The parasite is primarily transmitted by cats, through their feces. But cats don’t normally eat cat feces, so path of transmission is often more complicated. In the ideal scenario (for the parasite), rats eat the stuff. Then when a cat preys on an infected rat, the parasite infects the cat, starting the cycle anew. Amazingly, the parasite appears to have evolved to attack the brains of rats, making them easier for cats to catch by suppressing the rats’ fear of cats and motivating them to move around more often so they are easier to spot.

You can read the rest here
http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/...ouse_cats/

Still keeping my cats probably to late any ways lmao.gif
12-10-2012, 04:11 AM #2
オタマジャクシ Member
Posts:1,310 Threads:32 Joined:Nov 2012
(12-10-2012, 03:52 AM)DiggerDawg Wrote:  UP TO HALF OF ALL HUMANS ARE INFECTED BY A CAT-BORNE PARASITE THAT CAN CAUSE STILLBIRTH, BRAIN DAMAGE, AND A HOST OF OTHER SUBTLE NEUROLOGICAL EFFECTS. IS VACCINATION THE SOLUTION?

İmage

Credit: Flickr user kevindooley
Toxoplasmosis is a serious disease when transmitted from a pregnant mother to the unborn fetus, potentially resulting in stillbirth, brain damage, or long-term eye damage that can lead to blindness. Even worse, it’s extremely common in a most common animal, the house cat—and it’s easily transmissible from cats to humans. The parasite that causes it, Toxoplasma gondii, is found in one-third to one-half of all humans—over two billion individuals! This potential killer likes to take up residence inside your brain.

So why don’t we hear more about toxoplasmosis? There are a couple reasons. First, it’s a relatively benign disease for most people, comparable to a moderate flu. Second, it’s much less common in its most dangerous form, when transmitted from a pregnant woman to the fetus. This is because it’s only likely to be transmitted if the mother was recently infected herself. Still, it’s estimated that the disease costs as much as eight billion dollars a year in the US; it affects over 1 in 15,000 childbirths in the US and as many as 1 in 500 in parts of the world where the disease is more common.

British science writer Ed Yong gives a good introduction to T. gondii in this post: The parasite is primarily transmitted by cats, through their feces. But cats don’t normally eat cat feces, so path of transmission is often more complicated. In the ideal scenario (for the parasite), rats eat the stuff. Then when a cat preys on an infected rat, the parasite infects the cat, starting the cycle anew. Amazingly, the parasite appears to have evolved to attack the brains of rats, making them easier for cats to catch by suppressing the rats’ fear of cats and motivating them to move around more often so they are easier to spot.

You can read the rest here
http://seedmagazine.com/content/article/...ouse_cats/

Still keeping my cats probably to late any ways lmao.gif


If you are concerned about Toxoplasmosis move to a mostly Chinese community and let your cat outside periodically.
12-10-2012, 04:46 AM #3
DiggerDawg Member
Posts:401 Threads:34 Joined:Sep 2012
nah unlike most i like america and cats are not considered good eating here
İmage
but bacon on the other hand drool.gif
12-10-2012, 05:07 AM #4
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,979 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
No I don't think vaccination, but a good hygiene seems to work wonders for a lot of reasons.

Kind of funny now though when we finally have snow I can follow kitty tracks around the house. They don't come around anymore, I let our puppy out enough to chase them off.
12-11-2012, 03:16 PM #5
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:10,779 Threads:647 Joined:Feb 2011
Two things: First, the parasite causes the rats to be attracted to cat urine which makes it easy for the cats. Second, recent research is showing that T. gondii may be responsible for schizophrenia and some bipolar disorders.

Politicians hide themselves away
They only started the war
Why should they go out to fight?
They leave that role to poor
12-11-2012, 05:20 PM #6
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,393 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
(12-11-2012, 03:16 PM)Kreeper Wrote:  Two things: First, the parasite causes the rats to be attracted to cat urine which makes it easy for the cats. Second, recent research is showing that T. gondii may be responsible for schizophrenia and some bipolar disorders.


Interesting, I was not aware of the schizophrenia and bipolar disorder link. Makes sense, every one I've ever known with more than two cats have been um... well chuckle.gif

wonder.gif
12-11-2012, 05:27 PM #7
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:42,979 Threads:1,473 Joined:Feb 2011
İmage

damned.gif
12-11-2012, 08:24 PM #8
Kreeper Griobhtha
Posts:10,779 Threads:647 Joined:Feb 2011
(12-11-2012, 05:20 PM)JayRodney Wrote:  
(12-11-2012, 03:16 PM)Kreeper Wrote:  Two things: First, the parasite causes the rats to be attracted to cat urine which makes it easy for the cats. Second, recent research is showing that T. gondii may be responsible for schizophrenia and some bipolar disorders.


Interesting, I was not aware of the schizophrenia and bipolar disorder link. Makes sense, every one I've ever known with more than two cats have been um... well chuckle.gif


Explains a lot about those cat hoarders too...


damned.gif

Politicians hide themselves away
They only started the war
Why should they go out to fight?
They leave that role to poor
12-11-2012, 08:32 PM #9
UniqueStranger Art in my heart
Posts:15,028 Threads:426 Joined:Jun 2012
Just to be fair to cats, dogs also can cause diseases in humans.

http://www.petshed.com/petcyclopedia/hum...-dogs.html

İmage

İmage

chuckle.gif



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