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What It's Like When The FBI Asks You To Backdoor Your Software - makes me feel hopeful
01-10-2014, 11:03 PM #1
Wayne5 Member
Posts:660 Threads:61 Joined:Nov 2013
At a recent RSA Security Conference, Nico Sell was on stage announcing that her company—Wickr—was making drastic changes to ensure its users' security. She said that the company would switch from RSA encryption to elliptic curve encryption, and that the service wouldn't have a backdoor for anyone.

As she left the stage, before she'd even had a chance to take her microphone off, a man approached her and introduced himself as an agent with the Federal Bureau of Investigation. He then proceeded to "casually" ask if she'd be willing to install a backdoor into Wickr that would allow the FBI to retrieve information.

A Common Practice
This encounter, and the agent's casual demeanor, is apparently business as usual as intelligence and law enforcement agencies seek to gain greater access into protected communication systems. Since her encounter with the agent at RSA, Sell says it's a story she's heard again and again. "It sounds like that's how they do it now," she told SecurityWatch. "Always casual, testing, because most people would say yes."

The FBI's goal is to see into encrypted, secure systems like Wickr and others. Under the Communications Assistance for Law Enforcement Act (CALEA) legislation, law enforcement can tap any phone in the US but they can't read encrypted communications. We've also seen how law enforcement have followed the lead of the NSA, and gathered data en-masse from cellphone towers. With the NSA reportedly installing backdoors onto hardware sitting in UPS facilities and allegedly working to undermine cryptographic standards, it's not surprising that the FBI would be operating along similar lines.

The Difference
It was clear that the FBI agent didn't know who he was dealing with, because Sell did not back down. Instead, she lectured him on topics ranging from the First and Fourth Amendments to the Constitution, to George Washington's creation of a Post Office in the US. "My ancestor was a drummer boy under Washington," Sell explained. "Washington thought it was very important to have freedom of information and private correspondence without government surveillance."

Her lecture concluded, she proceeded to grill the agent. "I asked if he had official paperwork for me, if this was an official request, who his boss was," said Sell. "He backed down very quickly."

Though she didn't budge for the agent, Sell makes it clear that surveillance and security is a complicated issue. "Ten years ago, I'd have said yes," said Sell. "Because if law enforcement asks you to catch bad guys, who wouldn't want to help?"

The difference now, she explained, was her experiences at BlackHat. Among those, Sell pointed to a BlackHat event where Thomas Cross demonstrated how to break into lawful intercept machines—or wiretaps. "It was very clear that a backdoor for the good guys is always a backdoor for the bad guys."

http://securitywatch.pcmag.com/security/...r-software
01-11-2014, 12:05 AM #2
Softy Incognito Anonymous
 
so who is the good guys,,,

and who is the bad guys???...

(:X
01-11-2014, 12:17 AM #3
Wayne5 Member
Posts:660 Threads:61 Joined:Nov 2013
Shorty, we are all bad guys. Sometimes we find the strength inside of ourselves to do the right thing at the cost of everything. And sometimes we realize that we have fooled ourselves and thrown it all away for nothing.

I believe that privacy is good and important and sometimes ordinary people pay for freedom even in blood, we are all soldiers. We command ourselves and we pick our battles and we hope at the end that we have no regrets.

coffeetime.gif
01-11-2014, 12:57 AM #4
Softy Incognito Anonymous
 
Vain5,,,where does it end???,,,them don't like the internet either,,,

freedom of speech and all that,,,make you pay for the internet,,,

screen everything that goes on it,,,it has already been proposed,,,

is that the future you want???,,,cause that is where all this is

headed,,,some countries,,,already there,,,have been for awhile...

(:X
01-11-2014, 02:04 AM #5
Wayne5 Member
Posts:660 Threads:61 Joined:Nov 2013
You are correct! Even good guys can get confused. Reagan was going to shut down search engines because the information on the internet might not be classified but compilations of unclassified information could make up a classified report. He decided not to because the economy took top priority for him and his advisers told him if we didn't do it Europe would and we would lose the money. Clinton was right "its the economy stupid" it should have been "its ALWAYS the economy stupid".

There are two entities that are a danger.
1. The intelligence community - they think we need to be saved from the truth in order to make us safe. Boy if these are the best and the brightest we are screwed.

2. Corporations - they think we get too much for what we paying and they want to create a new super internet that will make it possible for them to squeeze everyone for more money.

The answer is "NO" I don't want it. I am willing to take the risk of being less safe and I am willing to put up with any group putting up a site, even the perfs, to keep the internet as free as possible.

If you are going to write a letter, I'll write two. If you are going to march I will too.
I don't think the left or the right is going to be on our side.

coffeetime.gif
01-11-2014, 02:09 AM #6
Octo Mother Superior
Posts:43,017 Threads:1,474 Joined:Feb 2011
Shorty and Vain5... lmao.giflmao.giflmao.gif
01-11-2014, 02:15 AM #7
Wayne5 Member
Posts:660 Threads:61 Joined:Nov 2013
rofl.gif rofl.gif rofl.gif My apology Softy! I have no defense and I won't try to get out of it. lmao.gif
01-11-2014, 02:45 AM #8
JayRodney ⓐⓛⓘⓔⓝ
Posts:31,396 Threads:1,439 Joined:Feb 2011
(01-11-2014, 12:05 AM)Softy Wrote:  so who is the good guys,,,

and who is the bad guys???...

(:X

These tactics are going to cost the US a considerable amount.

Study: NSA Spying May Cost U.S. Companies $35 Billion

Network spying could discourage $35 billion in cloud-computing sales through 2016

That's also a lot of tax revenue gone.

This whole damn thing is an embarrassment, and the govt has lost a lot in the trustworthy department, even in the eyes of the fluffiest of sheep.

In fact it looks compromised, paranoid and just plain creepy.

It's all bad.

wonder.gif
01-11-2014, 03:20 AM #9
Softy Incognito Anonymous
 
It was clear that the FBI agent didn't know who he was dealing with, because Sell did not back down. Instead, she lectured him on topics ranging from the First and Fourth Amendments to the Constitution, to George Washington's creation of a Post Office in the US. "My ancestor was a drummer boy under Washington," Sell explained. "Washington thought it was very important to have freedom of information and private correspondence without government surveillance."

The good old days,,,when the government served the people,,,

now it is turned upside down,,,and yeah JayRodney we have lost the trust,,,

and the business,,,export business too,,,and probably a lot more,,,

should have kept this stuff a secret,,,and there is one of the biggest

problems,,,Snowden gets not only a little bit,,,but a whole lot,,,

and he was a contractor,,,what is to keep whoever from getting whatever,,,

not just the .gov,,,but whoever from the outside even,,,now that it is

unencrypted and sitting there,,,and have no doubt the .gov can take apart

anything that is out there,,,or is real close to being able to do so,,,and

they can't keep it a secret,,,and can't tell us they can...

(:X
01-11-2014, 03:31 AM #10
Softy Incognito Anonymous
 
(01-11-2014, 02:04 AM)Wayne5 Wrote:  Clinton was right "its the economy stupid" it should have been "its ALWAYS the economy stupid".


Boy if these are the best and the brightest we are screwed.


The answer is "NO" I don't want it. I am willing to take the risk of being less safe and I am willing to put up with any group putting up a site, even the perfs, to keep the internet as free as possible.


coffeetime.gif

Hi Wayne5,

The economy is number one,,,wonder why we have lawyers running things,,,

instead of business men,,,at least a good handful,,,though the good ones are

already rich and won't run,,,except those with egos to be the .prez,,,I guess,,,

anyway,,,afraid our intel community may not be all that bright,,,already screwed

up more than once,,,so this is what we are left with,,,and probably one of the

biggest reasons they will leave the internet free of interference,,,hoping someone

else will screw up,,,and yeah be nice to leave something kinda free,,,though

sure it is all scanned,,,bet the computer has fun with my posts,,,most people

can't even understand them...

(:X



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